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Ina Kok

Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)
Winner of the 2015 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

The aims of this publication are twofold. In the first place it gives a complete census of the woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered. In the second place a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer have been given. With this inventory dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts – the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

This publication was made possible with the cooperation of many libraries and institutions worldwide:
Stichting Huis Bergh, 's-Heerenberg, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, Antwerpen, Belgium (UNESCO Werelderfgoed); Ruusbroec-Genootschap, Antwerpen, Belgium; Erfgoedbibliotheek Hendrik Consience, Antwerpen, Belgium; Staatsbibliothek, Berlin, Germany; Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, France; Bibliothèque Royale Albert Ier, Bruxelles, Belgium; University Library, Cambridge, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Köln, Germany; Kongelige Biblioteket, Kopenhagen, Denmark; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Darmstadt, Germany; Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek, Deventer, Netherlands; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland; Universitätsbibliothek, Frankfurt, Germany; Universitätsbibliothek, Freiburg, Germany; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Gent, Belgium; Niedersächsische Staats- und Unversitätsbibliothek, Göttingen, Germany; Librije, Gouda, Netherlands; Unversitätsbibliothek, Greifswald, Germany; Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands; Gemeente Archief, Haarlem, Netherlands; Stadsbibliotheek, Haarlem, Netherlands; Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Houghton Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Friesch Genootschap, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; Erfgoed Leiden en omstreken, Leiden, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Leiden, Netherlands; Bibliothèque de l'Université, Liège, Belgium; British Library, London, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Lüneburg, Germany; Regionaal historisch centrum Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; Draiflessen Collection (Liberna Collection), Mettingen, Germany; Koninklijk Zeeuwsch Genootschap der Wetenschappen, Middelburg, Netherlands; Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, Germany; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Münster, Germany; Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven CT, USA; Morgan Library, New York NY, USA; Bibliothek des Evangelischen Predigerseminars Wittenberg, Germany; Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France; Huntington Library, San Marino CA, USA; Universitetsbibliothek, Stockholm, Sweden; Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany; Royal Dutch Library, The Hague, Netherlands; Universitätsbibliothek, Trier, Germany; Universitetsbibliothek, Uppsala, Sweden; Rijksmuseum Catharijne Convent, Utrecht, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Utrecht, Netherlands; Bibliothèque Municipale, Valenciennes, France; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection, Library of Congress, Washington DC, USA.

Print Culture and Peripheries in Early Modern Europe

A Contribution to the History of Printing and the Book Trade in Small European and Spanish Cities

Series:

Edited by Benito Rial Costas

Despite the fact that, if only by number, small and peripheral cities played an important role in fifteenth and sixteenth-century European print culture, book history has mainly been dominated by monographs on individual big book centres. Through a number of specific case studies, which deploy a variety of methods and a wide range of sources, this volume seeks to enhance our understanding of printing and the book trade in small and peripheral European cities in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and to emphasize the necessity of new research for the study of print culture in such cities.

Western Crime Fiction Goes East

The Russian Pinkerton Craze 1907-1934

Series:

Boris Dralyuk

This book examines the staggering popularity of early-twentieth-century Russian detective serials. Traditionally maligned as “Pinkertonovshchina,” these appropriations of American and British detective stories featuring Nat Pinkerton, Nick Carter, Sherlock Holmes, Ethel King, and scores of other sleuths swept the Russian reading market in successive waves between 1907 and 1917, and famously experienced a “red” resurgence in the 1920s under the aegis of Nikolai Bukharin. The book presents the first holistic view of “Pinkertonovshchina” as a phenomenon, and produces a working model of cross-cultural appropriation and reception. The “red Pinkerton” emerges as a vital “missing link” between pre- and post-Revolutionary popular literature, and marks the fitful start of a decades-long negotiation between the regime, the author, and the reading masses.

The Poetic Works of Helius Eobanus Hessus

Volume 3: King of Poets, 1514-1517

Series:

Harry Vredeveld

Hailed as “King of Poets” by Johann Reuchlin in 1514, Eobanus Hessus (1488–1540) was eager to build on his fame with a stream of new works: “Easter Hymn,” “On True Nobility,” “On the Avoidance of Drunkenness,” “Response from His Majesty Maximilian” (answering Hutten’s “Letter from Italia”), and the short epic “Christ’s Victory over the Underworld,” as well as a hitherto unknown “Inaugural Lecture” on Cicero and Plautus. In 1515 he anonymously published a mock-quodlibetical speech that applies the scholastic method of argumentation to “The Species of Drunkards.” Eobanus’ first bestseller, this brilliant satire was reprinted well into the eighteenth century. All of these texts are included in the present volume, along with annotated translations, ground-breaking introductions, and commentary.

Shaping the Bible in the Reformation

Books, Scholars and Their Readers in the Sixteenth Century

Series:

Edited by Bruce Gordon and Matthew McLean

This volume presents significant new research on several
aspects of the late mediaeval and early modern Bible. These
essays consider aspects of Bible scholarship and translation,
illustration and production, its uses for lay devotion and in
theological controversy. Inquiring into the ways in which
scholars gave new forms to their Bibles and their readers
received their work, this book considers the contribution of
key figures like Castellio, Bibliander and Tremellius, Piscator
and Calov, the exegetical controversies between centres
of Reformed learning and among the theologians of the
Louvain. It encompasses biblical illustration in the Low
Countries and the use of maps in the Geneva Bible, and
considers the practice of biblical translation, and the strategies by which new versions were justified.

French Books III & IV (FB) (2 vols.)

Books published in France before 1601 in Latin and Languages other than French

Edited by Andrew Pettegree and Malcolm Walsby

French Books III & IV complete a comprehensive bibliographical survey of all books published in France in the first age of print. It lists over 40,000 editions printed in France in languages other than French during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries together with bibliographical references, an introduction and indexes. It draws on the analysis of over 3,000 collections situated in libraries throughout the world. French Books will be an invaluable research tool for all students and scholars interested in the history, culture and literature of France, as well as historians of the early modern book world.

For vols. I & II please go to French Vernacular Books.
Sephardic Editions, 1550-1820: Installment 3
Spanish and Portuguese books written and/or published by Sephardic Jews of Early Modern Europe

Library of Jewish heritage
The present selection reflects the impressive cultural achievements of these "New Jews" and former conversos, who are also called Western Sephardim. In communities such as Ferrara, Amsterdam, Hamburg, London, and Bayonne, these Iberians - who had been raised as Catholics, and were largely unaware of Hebrew and formal Judaism - reconnected with their ancestral faith through the creation of an authentic library of Jewish heritage in the Spanish and the Portuguese language.

Modern Jews
Numerous Bibles, prayer books, and a whole range of works on the essentials of Judaism and the duties of a Jew were published in the vernacular. However, book-printing was not limited to re-education in Judaism alone; many of the works written or printed by the former conversos also reflect the broad cultural interest, and the academic background, they had brought with them from Spain and Portugal. Precisely the encounter between Iberian Renaissance culture and the rediscovered Judaism in environments such as the cosmopolitan, tolerant city of Amsterdam, turned these Western Sephardim into the first "modern Jews," as is exemplified by the life and works of such eminent figures as Uriel da Costa, Menasseh ben Israel, and Joseph Penso de la Vega.

Most influential works
This selection comprises the most influential works written or printed by the Iberian Jews in the major centers of the Western Sephardi Diaspora (e.g., the Netherlands, France, Italy, Germany, England); it includes all genres and reflects both their religious and their secular culture. Many of the editions included in Meyer Kayserling's bibliography are exceedingly rare and are available only in specialized collections of Judaica. The aim of the present selection is to make the Sephardi heritage generally available in order to meet the needs of modern scholarship.

Harm den Boer, University of Amsterdam

Series:

Gina Dahl

During recent decades much has been written about early modern book distribution, but until now Norway has been absent from the discussion. Drawing on book listings, this study seeks to fill this lacuna by exploring the market for books in early modern Norway. Its approach is multifaceted: consideration of the types of books accessed by different elements of Norwegian society is set alongside developments within the book market itself, such as the extended life of popular books, the gradual replacement of Latin by the vernacular and the rise in the eighteenth century in the number of books available on the market. The study demonstrates the internationality of the Norwegian book market while acknowledging specific patterns that determine its Norwegian character.

Series:

Laura Delbrugge

A Scholarly Edition of Andrés de Li’s Thesoro de la passion (1494) is the first new edition of this early Castilian Passion text in five hundred years. Originally published in 1494 by the prolific Zaragozan printer Pablo Hurus, this beautifully illustrated devotional offers the modern reader a glimpse into the complex social world of late fifteenth-century Spain. Li’s converso identity permeates his retelling of the Passion through expositions on hypocrisy, anti-Semitism, and false faith. This new, modernized edition of the Thesoro de la passion dramatically illustrates the unique confluence of social, religious, and cultural forces present during the emergence of Spain’s national identity via analyses of the Thesoro’s Classical, Castilian, and Catalan sources, its importance as an early printed book, Li’s portrayal of the Virgin Mary, Christ, and the Passion events, and the importance of Li’s converso perspectives throughout the work.

Netherlandish Books (NB) (2 Vols.)

Books Published in the Low Countries and Dutch Books Printed Abroad before 1601

Edited by Andrew Pettegree and Malcolm Walsby

Netherlandish Books offers a unique overview of what was printed during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Low Countries. This bibliography lists descriptions of over 32,000 editions together with bibliographical references, an introduction and indexes. It draws on the analysis of collections situated in libraries throughout the world. This is the first time that all the books published in the various territories that formed the Low Countries are presented together in a single bibliography. Netherlandish Books is an invaluable research tool for all students and scholars interested in the history, culture and literature of the Low Countries, as well as historians of the early modern book world.

Customers interested in this title may also be interested in French Vernacular Books, edited by Andrew Pettegree, Malcolm Walsby and Alexander Wilkinson.