Browse results

You are looking at 31 - 35 of 35 items for :

  • Brill | Hes & De Graaf x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Space in America

Theory – History – Culture

Series:

Edited by Klaus Benesch and Kerstin Schmidt

America's sense of space has always been tied to what Hayden White called the narrativization of real events. If the awe-inspiring manifestations of nature in America (Niagara Falls, Virginia's Natural Bridge, the Grand Canyon, etc.) were often used as a foil for projecting utopian visions and idealizations of the nation's exceptional place among the nations of the world, the rapid technological progress and its concomitant appropriation of natural spaces served equally well, as David Nye argues, to promote the dominant cultural idiom of exploration and conquest.
From the beginning, American attitudes towards space were thus utterly contradictory if not paradoxical; a paradox that scholars tried to capture in such hybrid concepts as the middle landscape (Leo Marx), an engineered New Earth (Cecelia Tichi), or the technological sublime (David Nye). Not only was America's concept of space paradoxical, it has always also been a contested terrain, a site of continuous social and cultural conflict. Many foundational issues in American history (the dislocation of Native and African Americans, the geo-political implications of nation-building, immigration and transmigration, the increasing division and clustering of contemporary American society, etc.) involve differing ideals and notions of space. Quite literally, space and its various ideological appropriations formed the arena where America's search for identity (national, political, cultural) has been staged. If American democracy, as Frederick Jackson Turner claimed, is born of free land, then its history may well be defined as the history of the fierce struggles to gain and maintain power over both the geographical, social and political spaces of America and its concomitant narratives.
The number and range of topics, interests, and critical approaches of the essays gathered here open up exciting new avenues of inquiry into the tangled, contentious relations of space in America. Topics include: Theories of Space - Landscape / Nature - Technoscape / Architecture / Urban Utopia - Literature - Performance / Film / Visual Arts.

Conciliation – Compulsion – Conversion

British Attitudes Towards Indigenous Peoples 1763-1814

Series:

Merete Falck Borch

This work is an examination of British imperial policy and attitudes towards the original inhabitants in the American colonies, New South Wales and the Cape colony of South Africa. A comparative study of the formative phase in this area of policy, it covers the period between the mid-eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, examining and comparing the development of policy in each of the three geographical regions and tracing the legal and intellectual context within which this policy took shape. It suggests an important shift of attitude towards indigenous peoples in the course of the period covered – a change that had a major impact on political perceptions and policy formation.

The Model Man

A Life of Edward William Bok, 1863-1930

Series:

Hans Krabbendam

Edward William Bok was the most famous Dutch-American in early twentieth-century America thanks to his thirty-year editorship of the Ladies’ Home Journal, the most prestigious women’s magazine of the day. This first complete coverage of Edward Bok’s life places him against his ethnic background and portrays him as the spokesman for and the molder of the American middle class between 1890 and 1930. He acted as a mediator between a Victorian and a modern society, reconciling consumerism with idealism. As a Dutch immigrant he became a model for successful adaptation to a new country and modern times. He used his national reputation to restore America’s internationalism in the 1920s. His life story is relevant to those interested in the history of immigration, journalism, the rise of big business, the women’s movement, and the Progressive Movement.

A Revolt Against Liberalism

American Radical Historians, 1959-1976

Series:

A.A.M. van der Linden

This is the first study to provide a comprehensive picture of the revolt brought about by American radical historians in the 1960s and 1970s. With the turbulent sixties as a backdrop, the work of radical luminaries like Eugene Genovese, Herbert Gutman, Staughton Lynd, William Appleman Williams and Howard Zinn is discussed. These historians made a significant contribution to present-day notions about slavery, working-class history, the New Deal, the Cold War and a wealth of other subjects. Their main target was American liberalism. Radical criticism centered on the liberal concepts of the division of power and of the nature of man. The acrimonious debate which ensued tore the historical profession apart. Therefore most historians have stressed the disagreements between liberals and radicals. Yet, in this study it will be argued that in some respects the radicals were part and parcel of mainstream historiography, though they presented a radical version of it.

What Future for Japan?

U.S. Wartime Planning for the Postwar Era, 1942-1945

Series:

Rudolf Janssens

Within a few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States government began to plan a policy for a defeated Japan. In order to avoid any future attacks on the United States, Japanese society had to be changed. Politicians, Japan specialists, historians, political scientists, and anthropologists debated the future of Japan. Topics ranged from the future role of the Emperor and politics, to Japanese economy, to re-education of the Japanese people. Eventually an overall policy for postwar Japan was formulated, which was to a high degree executed by General Douglas MacArthur during the Occupation of Japan.
This study is based on research in the records of the government policy planners, both private papers and official records. It is the first book-length study of the American planning for the occupation of Japan, including the drafting of policy, not only in the State Department but also in the War Department, Office of Strategic Services, and the Office of War Information. The analysis focuses on the development of strategies for remodeling postwar Japan as well as on the meaning of Japan constructed by various planners and decision makers and the impact of their constructions on American Occupation policy.