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Valentina Denzel

Abstract

In 1697, Henriette-Julie de Castelnau, comtesse de Murat replies to the misogynistic Mémoires de la vie du Comte D***, published the previous year and falsely attributed to Saint-Évremond, with the publication of her Mémoires de Madame la Comtesse de M***. Murat’s work is dedicated to a female readership, and denounces the treacherousness of men who first seduce women and then blame them for their debauchery. The complex relationship between the Mémoires de la vie du Comte D*** and the Mémoires de Madame la Comtesse de M*** is due not only to their opposite positions in the Querelle des femmes: the first work advances misogynist stereotypes, while the second features “misogamist” and feminist counter-arguments. The two authors also take different stances on the genre of the novel. L’abbé Villiers, the real author of Mémoires de la vie du Comte D***, criticizes the novel for blending literary genres, as well as for its play with history and fiction, and its depictions of love scenes. According to Villiers, the erotic narrative of the novel that pretends to relate true and authentic events is misleading and encourages the readership to commit acts of debauchery. Villiers underlines in his work that women are particularly prone to coquetry and men fall too easily victims to female charms. Villiers had already criticized the novel in his previous works, and decided to write a mémoire himself, in order to better unmask its fictionality.

Series:

Françoise Lionnet

Abstract

This essay uses a mixed-media interdisciplinary approach to bring together photography and literature, anthropology, phenomenology, and close readings of cultural texts from the francophone Mascarene Islands. I focus on two Mauritian artists, the photographer Jano Couacaud and the novelist Carl de Souza, who bring the experience and significance of hard physical labor to our shocked attention. Interconnected networks of production and consumption remain largely obscure to unaware or indifferent Western devourers of distant commodities such as sugar and fish. Couacaud and de Souza puncture widespread illusions about free-market mobilities and customer choice, exposing the seamier side of late-capitalism and the age-old exploitation of food-industry workers, in which we are all complicit. These artists’ respective visual and literary aesthetic foregrounds the intensity of postcolonial and globalized labor while forcing us to rethink the links among subjectivity, violence, embodiment, and the meaning of sociality.

Series:

Ludovic Piffaut

Abstract

L’Isle des foux by Egidio Duni was performed at Paris’s Comédie Italienne in december 1760. The text of the comic opera, created principally by Louis Anseaume, is inspired by Carlo Goldoni’s Dramma comico L’Arcifanfano, re dei Matti which was performed in Venice less than twenty years before the creation of L’Isle des foux. Due to its parodic nature, this work symbolised the hybridity between two lyric genres – Italian Opera and French Theater – genres that in the Eighteenth Century were seen as two independant entities. Anseaume’s thematic use of madness, is directly in correlation with Goldoni’s verses. Although these two works came from different poetic et musical cultures, they entered into mutual conversation. The work of Italian composer Duni demonstrates how the lens of hybridity can give a new impetus tounderstanding this satiric and original theme.

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Edited by Rossitsa Terzieva-Artemis

For the centenary of Ford Madox Ford’s The Good Soldier (1915), this volume originally re-examines some well-known issues surrounding the text and its “mad about writing” author: the Conrad-Ford friendship and literary collaboration; Modernist agenda(s) and Impressionist techniques; genre innovations and philosophical questions. The dialogue between established and young Ford scholars produces a challenging kaleidoscope of insights into the work of this controversial English writer and his perennial novel.

Contributors are:
Asunción López-Varela Azcárate, Marc Ouellette, Lucie Boukalova, Allan Pero, Dean Bowers, Aimee L. Pozorski, Chris Forster, J. Fitzpatrick Smith, Edward Lobb, Timothy Sutton, Gabrielle Moyer, Joseph Wiesenfarth.

Series:

Alistair Charles Rolls, Clara Dominque Sitbon and Marie-Laure Jacqueline Vuaille-Barcan

In Origins and Legacies of Marcel Duhamel’s Série Noire Alistair Rolls, Clara Sitbon and Marie-Laure Vuaille-Barcan counter the myths and received wisdom that are typically associated with this iconic French crime fiction series, namely: that it was born in Paris on a tide of postwar euphoria; that it initially consisted of translations of American hard-boiled classics by the likes of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler; and that the translations were rushed and rather approximate. Instead, an alternative vision of Duhamel’s translation practice is proposed, one based on a French tradition of auto-, or “original”, translation of “ostensibly” American crime fiction, and one that appropriates the source text in order to create an allegory of the target culture.