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Sabine Gross and Steve Ostovich

Series:

Laura D. Gelfand

Abstract

The interdisciplinary essays gathered in this volume examine the diverse roles played by dogs in Medieval and Early Modern society, including how these were developed, enforced, and performed. These essays consider a wide range of interactions and representations across Europe, in Japan, and within Islamic culture. Contributors investigate, among other things, the dog as companion, iconographic signifier, saint, sinner, urban citizen, and laborer. The ways in which dogs were integrated into society and their behavior was molded and controlled is a particular focus. The volume provides rich new source material for scholars and dog lovers who wish to gain a more complete understanding of canine/human relations during the Medieval and Early Modern periods.

Series:

Edited by Sabine Gross and Steve Ostovich

Series:

Akiko Walley

Featuring the renowned seventh-century gilt-bronze Śākyamuni (Shaka) triad at the Hōryūji, Constructing the Dharma King reveals how the impression of a Buddhist image evolved in Yamato, Japan, from the indistinct sense of divine otherness at the early stage of the transmission to more concrete ideals and values concerning families, authority, and kingship.

According to the accompanying inscription, the Kashiwade, a low-ranking bureaucratic clan, commissioned the triad to commemorate the deaths of its family members. Considering the triad as an endpoint of a dynamic political re-envisioning spearheaded by Soga no Umako (d. 626) and the members of the Yamato sovereignty, Akiko Walley argues that the Kashiwade constructed the Shaka triad not simply as a private act of devotion, but a pivotal political act that demonstrated their allegiance and loyalty. This publication contends that the appearance of the Shaka triad was chosen to echo the new vision of a “Dharma King” that was manifested in Prince Umayato as the political persona orchestrated by Umako, and in the preceding Shaka triad statue at Asukadera produced by Umako and his closest allies. In the course of discussion, this book also reexamines the key points of debate surrounding this statue, including the reliability of the accompanying inscription, identity of its makers, and the statue’s ties to the sculptural trends on the Asian continent.

To My Dear Pieternelletje

Grandfather and Granddaughter in VOC Time, 1710-1720

Bea Brommer

To my dear Pieternelletje describes a ten-year period in the lives of Pieternella van Hoorn and her grandfather Willem van Outhoorn, former governor-general of the Dutch East Indies. Eleven years old, Pieternella left for Amsterdam and the only contact possible was by mail.

Numerous letters have survived and combined with contemporaneous documents, most of them never published before, they offer a vivid and clear picture of their private life and feelings, forming a most welcome addition to official VOC-history.

Van Outhoorn not only acted as Pieternella’s mentor while she tried to adjust to her new but unknown fatherland, but also sent her numerous exquisite presents, the greater part of which has been traced and described in full, thus offering new insight in the cultural history of Asia.