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Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

Series:

Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

Series:

Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

Series:

Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

Series:

Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

Capitalism, Alienation and Critique

Studies in Economy and Dialectics (Dialectics, Deontology and Democracy, Vol. I)

Series:

Asger Sørensen

Edited by Lisbet Rosenfeldt Svanøe

In Capitalism, Alienation and Critique Asger Sørensen offers a wide-ranging argument for the classical Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School, thus endorsing the dialectical approach of the original founders (Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse) and criticizing suggested revisions of later generations (Habermas, Honneth). Being situated within the horizon of the late 20th century Cultural Marxism, the main issue is the critique of capitalism, emphasizing experiences of injustice, ideology and alienation, and in particular exploring two fundamental subject matters within this horizon, namely economy and dialectics. Apart from in-depth discussions of classical political economy and Hegelian dialectics, the explorative and inclusive argument also takes issues with Émile Durkheim’s theory of value, the general economy of Georges Bataille and the dialectics of Mao Zedong.

Paul Robert Gilbert

In this article, I examine the relationship between the speculative projects embarked upon by young entrepreneurs and bankers in Dhaka during 2013, and the attempts made by analysts and nation-branding experts to present Bangladesh as a worthy “frontier” for speculative foreign investment. In order to induce others to speculate on their visions for Bangladesh, they variously positioned the nation via reference to the ratings imposed on it by credit rating agencies, the emergence of regional hegemons including members of the brics, and the apparent decline of “formerly” developed European nations. As purchasing power comes to mark a nation’s position within a hierarchical global market, nationhood comes to be recast as consumer-citizenship. The speculative imaginaries projected by these entrepreneurs, bankers and nation-branding experts have the capacity to both reinforce and rework the hierarchies into which “frontier” nations are routinely placed by analysts in global financial centres.