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Jim Kline

ABSTRACT

For over seven hundred years, the legend of the Pied Piper has inspired folk tales, poems, songs, and theatrical productions, as well as speculations about whether the legend is based upon actual events that occurred on 26 June 1284, the date given to the incident according to several commemorative documents and monuments found in the town of Hamelin, Germany, where the legend originated. Many scholars who have studied the legend believe it has little to do with a Pied Piper ridding the town of rats and later enticing the town's children to follow him out of town where they all disappear; instead, they believe the incident refers to a military recruiter who either led a troupe of young men to the Baltic or to Transylvania to establish settlements there. However, other scholars put great significance upon the date of the event and how it might be related to a summer solstice celebration gone awry. The following article provides evidence to support the summer solstice theory, presenting information relating to ancient solar bird traditions that link the piper with shamanic rites in which shamans dress as birds and perform bird sacrifices associated with both summer and winter solstice celebrations.

Matthew A. Fike

ABSTRACT

Jung explained the possible plagiaristic relationship between Henry Rider Haggard’s She and Pierre Benoît’s L’Atlantide as either cryptomnesia or archetypal inspiration, but he was misinformed about the case and unfamiliar with Benoît’s life. This essay critiques Jung’s statements about Benoît and then considers the case for plagiarism that was published in The French Quarterly in 1919–1920. Neither the typical reply – that L’Atlantide reflects the author’s African experience and historical knowledge – nor the reading of the novel that arose from Jung’s 1925 seminar adequately refutes the plagiarism charge. A depth-psychological reading of L’Atlantide shows the danger of seeking the anima archetype itself rather than experiencing the anima in a relationship with an available woman. But even if literary analogies, including the Circe myth, suggest that Haggard and Benoît may have tapped into the same archetypal vein, the novels’ similarities and verbal echoes cannot be dismissed outright.

Jim Kline

ABSTRACT

The figure of a half-human, half-feline boy appearing in a dream series of a middle-aged businessman suffering from job burnout is investigated from a Jungian perspective, noting its relevance to Jung’s concept of eros as a relatedness principle as well as an example of the puer aeternus or eternal child archetype. Further investigation into the feral boy figure reveals its compensatory function: a reaction to the dreamer’s regression to a more primitive state of self-identity and forced alienation from his business profession and his private life. Additional references to the feral boy from the Mesoamerican Olmec civilization provide evidence of the figure’s identity as an archetypal image of pathos, arousing sympathetic pity that leads to reconnecting the dreamer with his societal and familial responsibilities.

Valeria Céspedes Musso

ABSTRACT

This paper provides a depth-psychological analysis of the mass visions of the Virgin Mary taking place at Zeitoun, Egypt, during the late 1960s. A review of the literature points to a prevailing socio-political approach to examining visions of the Virgin Mary, while I argue that a satisfactory psychoanalytical approach is generally lacking. The interpretation I propose draws on Jung’s theoretical model in Flying Saucers with the aim of merging depth-psychology and historical material surrounding the Zeitoun phenomenon. Common themes and symbols are extracted and interpreted from the empirical material and analysed along with Egyptian social and political data. This study concludes with a discussion on how depth-psychological principles grounded in empirical and historical material could be applied in order to explicate cases of mass visions.

Jason Butler

ABSTRACT

The rupture between event and meaning has shown itself to be a key issue plaguing collective psychology. This rupture requires as remedy a poetic sensibility that can imagine the central images or root metaphors which make experience qualitatively intelligible, an imaginal literacy that reads images while also making new images from that which is presented. Bachelard’s [(1988). Air and dreams: An essay on the imagination of movement] notion of images as liberatory, disentangling one from superficial impressions by transmuting surface to depth, and Hillman’s [(1975). Re-visioning psychology] move of ‘seeing through’ the archetypal images expressed in events will serve as foundational ideas for the author’s description of poetic sensibility as the capacity to read and make images through ‘deform[ing] what we perceive’ (p. 1). The author will highlight the central function of poetic sensibility as an essential engagement of imagination required by any movement resisting the neocolonial policies and ‘inverted totalitarianism’ [Wolin, S. (2003). Inverted totalitarianism: How the Bush regime is effecting the transformation to a fascist-like state] of the corporate and political state.