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Series:

Urs Leu and Sandra Weidmann

The Swiss theologian Huldrych Zwingli (1484–1531) was one of the most prominent reformers and the founder of the Reformed Protestant Church in the Swiss Confederation. During the last hundred years more than 200 titles from his private library have been discovered. They give an interesting insight into his interests and sources. The present book contains not only an extensive introduction and a catalogue of these books and manuscripts, but also an inventory of the lost works possessed by Zwingli. They open the door to Zwingli’s study and to the intellectual world of an important reformer.

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Edited by Carme Font Paz and Nina Geerdink

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.

Early Modern Media and the News in Europe

Perspectives from the Dutch Angle

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Joop W. Koopmans

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Dutch Republic was one of the main centers of media in Europe. These media included newspapers, pamphlets, news digests, and engravings. Early Modern Media and the News in Europe brings together fifteen articles dealing with this early news industry in relation to politics and society, written by Joop W. Koopmans in recent decades. They demonstrate the important Dutch position within early modern news networks in Europe. Moreover, they address a variety of related themes, such as the supply of news during wars and disasters, the speed of early modern news reports, the layout of early newspapers and the news value of their advertisements, and censorship of books and news media.

Lost Books and Printing in London, 1557-1640

An Analysis of the Stationers' Company Register

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Alexandra Hill

Lost Books and Printing in London, 1557-1640 is the first attempt to analyse systematically the entries relating to lost books in the Stationers’ Company Register. Books played a fundamental role in early modern society and are key sources for our comprehension of the political, religious, economic and cultural aspects of the age. Over time, the loss of these books has presented a significant barrier to our understanding of the past. The monopoly of the Stationers’ Company centralised book production in England to London with printing jobs carried out by members documented in a Register. Using modern digital approaches to bibliography, Alexandra Hill uses the Register to reclaim knowledge of the English book trade and print culture that would otherwise be lost.

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Edited by Siv Gøril Brandtzæg, Paul Goring and Christine Watson

Travelling Chronicles presents fourteen episodes in the history of news, written by some of the leading scholars in the rapidly developing fields of news and newspaper studies. Ranging across eastern and western Europe and beyond, the chapters look back to the early modern period and into the eighteenth century to consider how the news of the past was gathered and spread, how news outlets gained respect and influence, how news functioned as a business, and also how the historiography of news can be conducted with the resources available to scholars today. Travelling Chronicles offers a timely analysis of early news, at a moment when historical newspaper archives are being widely digitalised and as the truth value of news in our own time undergoes intense scrutiny.

Johann Froben, Printer of Basel

A Biographical Profile and Catalogue of His Editions

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Valentina Sebastiani

In Johann Froben, Printer of Basel, Valentina Sebastiani offers a comprehensive account of the life and printing production of Froben, a major representative of early modern Europe’s most refined printing traditions. Some five centuries after they first appeared in print, Sebastiani provides a bibliography of the 329 Froben editions published in Basel between 1491 and 1527 (including an analysis of some 2,500 copies held in more than twenty-five libraries worldwide), listing the paratextual and visual elements that distinguish Froben’s books as well as economic, technical, and editorial details related to their production and distribution. Sebastiani’s study sheds new light on Froben’s family and career, his involvement in the editing and publication of Erasmus’ works, and the strategies he adopted to market them successfully.

K. Hoogendoorn

In this bibliography of the exact sciences in the Low Countries, Klaas Hoogendoorn gives a detailed analytical description by autopsy of all printed books published by scientists associated with the Low Countries from ca. 1470 to the Golden Age (1700). The books' locations are given, along with secondary bibliographical sources and concise biographies of the authors. Includes indexes of the editions by subject, printer/publisher and person.
Along with books on subjects including mathematics, physics, military science and navigation, the second part describes all known almanacs and prognostications for the period, providing the most complete survey yet available. It is a thoroughly revised and expanded update of D. Bierens de Haan’s Bibliographie néerlandaise historique-scientifique … (Rome, 1883) up to about 1700.

Incunabula in Transit

People and Trade

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Lotte Hellinga

Almost half a million books printed in the fifteenth century survive in collections worldwide. In Incunabula in Transit Lotte Hellinga explores how and where they were first disseminated. Propelled by the novel need to market hundreds of books, early printers formed networks with colleagues, engaged agents and traded Latin books over long distances. They adapted presentation to suit the taste of distinct readerships, local and remote. Publishing in vernacular languages required typographical innovations, as the chapter on William Caxton’s Flanders enterprise demonstrates. Eighteenth-century collectors dislodged books from institutions where they had rested since the sales drives of early printers. Erudite and entertaining, Hellinga’s evidence-based approach, linked to historical context, deepens understanding of the trade in early printed books.

Humanism, Theology, and Spiritual Crisis in Renaissance Florence: Giovanni Caroli’s Liber dierum lucensium

A Critical Edition, English Translation, Commentary, and Introduction

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Giovanni Caroli

Edited by Amos Edelheit

This is the first work by Giovanni Caroli (1428-1503) to appear in print. Caroli was one of the leading theologians in Florence during the last decades of the fifteenth century, a man who lived between the two great traditions of his time: the scholastic and the humanist. The volume contains a critical edition of the Latin text, entitled The Book of My Days in Lucca, an English translation, commentary notes and an introduction. Caroli presents us with his powerful personal reaction to the institutional crisis regarding the required reform in the Dominican Order, yet even here we already notice the pervasive influence of his classical education, and especially his acquaintance with authors such as Cicero, Livy, Tacitus, and especially Virgil.

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Nicolás Bas Martín

In Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London) Nicolás Bas examines the image of Spain in eighteenth-century Europe, and in Paris and London in particular. His material has been scoured from an exhaustive interrogation of the records of the book trade. He refers to booksellers’ catalogues, private collections, auctions, and other sources of information in order to reconstruct the country’s cultural image. Rarely have these sources been searched for Spanish books, and never have they been as exhaustively exploited as they are in Bas’ book.
Both England and France were conversant with some very negative ideas about Spain. The Black Legend, dating back to the sixteenth century, condemned Spain as repressive and priest-ridden. Bas shows however, that an alternative, more sympathetic, vision ran parallel with these negative views. His bibliographical approach brings to light the Spanish books that were bought, sold and ultimately read. The impression thus obtained is likely to help us understand not only Spain’s past, but also something of its present.