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The Asanids

The Political and Military History of the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185-1280)

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Alexandru Madgearu

In The Asanids. The Political and Military History of the Second Bulgarian Empire (1185-1280), Alexandru Madgearu offers the first comprehensive history in English of a state which played a major role in the evolution of the Balkan region during Middle Ages. This state emerged from the rebellion of two peoples, Romanians and Bulgarians, against Byzantine domination, within a few decades growing to a regional power that entered into conflict with Byzantium and with the Latin Empire of Constantinople. The founders were members of a Romanian (Vlach) family, whose intention was to revive the former Bulgarian state, the only legitimate political framework that could replace the Byzantine rule.

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Boris Zhivkov

In Khazaria in the Ninth and the Tenth Centuries Boris Zhivkov offers a new view on Khazaria by scrutinizing the different visions offered by recent scholarship. The paucity of written sources has made it necessary to turn to additional information about the steppe states in this period, and to analyze exceptional cases not directly related to the Khazars. In re-examining the Khazars, he thus uses not only the known documentary sources and archaeological finds but also what we know from history of religions (comparative mythology), history of art, structural anthropology and folklore studies. In this way the book draws together a synthesis of conclusions, information and theory.

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Anti Selart

This monograph by Anti Selart is the first comprehensive study available in English on the relations between northern crusaders and Rus'. Selart re-examines the central issues of this crucial period of establishing the medieval relations of the Catholic and Orthodox worlds like the Battle on the Ice (1242) and the role of Alexander Nevsky using the relevant source material of both “sides”. He also considers the wide context of the history of crusading and the whole Eastern and Northern Europe from Hungary and Poland to Denmark, Finland, and Sweden in 1180-1330. This monograph contests the existence of the constitutive religious conflict and extensive aggressive strategies in the region – the ideas which had played a central role in modern historiography and ideology.

Entangled Histories of the Balkans - Volume Three

Shared Pasts, Disputed Legacies

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Edited by Roumen Daskalov and Alexander Vezenkov

Modern Balkan history has traditionally been studied by national historians in terms of separate national histories taking place within bounded state territories. The authors in this volume take a different approach. They view the modern history of the region from a transnational and relational perspective in terms of shared and connected, as well as entangled histories. This regards the treatment of shared historical legacies by rival national historiographies. The volume deals with historiograpical disputes that arose in the process of “nationalizing” the past.

Contributors include: Diana Mishkova, Alexander Vezenkov, Roumen Daskalov, Tchavdar Marinov and Bernard Lory.

For the Common Good

The Bohemian Land Law and the Beginning of the Hussite Revolution

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Jeanne Grant

In For the Common Good: The Bohemian Land Law and the Beginning of the Hussite Revolution Jeanne E. Grant presents an interpretation of the mentality of leading nobles within the Czech kingdom to understand their political actions in the Hussite Revolution. The nobles’ viewpoint derived from a confluence of legal, political, and religious ideas. Analyzing these ideas in the law book written by Ondřej z Dubé, manifestos, and political documents, Jeanne E. Grant shows that both Hussite and Catholic representatives of the kingdom who participated in the revolution adhered to consistent and widespread conceptions of their relationship to the kingdom, crown, and king that compelled them to defend the common good as they understood it.

Bodzia

A Late Viking-Age Elite Cemetery in Central Poland

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Edited by Andrzej Buko

Bodzia is one of the most fascinating archaeological discoveries of the post-war period in Poland. It is one of the few cemeteries in Poland from the time of the origins of the Polish state. The unique character of this discovery is mainly due to the fact that a small, elite population was buried there. The burials there included people whose origins were connected with the Slavic, Nomadic-Khazarian and Scandinavian milieus. For the first time the evidence from this area is given prominence.
This book is designed mainly for readers outside Poland. The reader is offered a collection of chapters, combining analyses and syntheses of the source material, and a discussion of its etno-cultural and political significance. The authors formulate new hypotheses and ideas, which put the discoveries in a broader European context.
Contributors are Wiesław Bogdanowicz, Mateusz Bogucki, Andrzej Buko, Magdalena M. Buś, Maria Dekówna, Alicja Drozd-Lipińska, Władysław Duczko, Karin Margarita Frei, Tomasz Goslar, Tomasz Grzybowski, Zdzisław Hensel, Iwona Hildebrandt-Radke, Michał Kara, Joanna Koszałka, Anna B. Kowalska, Tomasz Kozłowski, Marek Krąpiec, Roman Michałowski, Michael Müller-Wille, T. Douglas Price, Tomasz Purowski, Tomasz Sawicki, Iwona Sobkowiak-Tabaka, Stanisław Suchodolski and Kinga Zamelska-Monczak.

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Silviu Ota

In The Mortuary Archaeology of the Medieval Banat (10th – 14th centuries) Silviu Oţa highlights the interactions between different ethnic groups as reflected in burial customs and funerary practices. The book will deal with the Banat as a whole (as opposed to the Romanian, Serbian or Hungarian parts of the region) since the modern political borders are not identical with the cultural boundaries in the Middle Ages. On a more general level, the goal of this book is to analyse the social dynamics in the region. The author rejects the idea that any of the "archaeological cultures" identified in the Banat (e.g. the Bjelo Brdo culture) may be associated with any single ethnic group.

Winner of the 2016 George Bariţiu Prize from the Romanian Academy for outstanding contribution to the development of Romanian culture and science in the area of history and archaeology. The prize, named after the towering figure of George Bariţiu (1812-1893) in nineteenth-century Romanian political and cultural life and former president of the Academy, is awarded for originality of the work, its contribution to its field, and its impact at the national level of the field development.

Between Lipany and White Mountain

Essays in Late Medieval and Early Modern Bohemian History in Modern Czech Scholarship

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Edited by James R. Palmitessa

This book presents a collection of twelve seminal essays by Czech historians on the history of the Czech lands from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries, which originally appeared in Czech publications as articles and book chapters and are translated here for the first time in English. The essays address a broad range of topics, including politics, religion, demography, everyday life, crime, and rural and urban society. By bringing to English-speaking readers the rich history and historical writing of the Czech lands through the lens of Czech historians, the book seeks to expand knowledge about the place of these lands in late medieval and early modern Europe, and the rich mosaic and shared history of the peoples and cultures of Europe.

The Making of Christian Moravia (858-882)

Papal Power and Political Reality

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Maddalena Betti

In The Making of Christian Moravia Maddalena Betti examines the creation of the Moravian archdiocese, of which St Methodius was the first incumbent, in the context of ninth-century papal policy in central and south-eastern Europe. In the nineteenth and twentieth century religious and nationalistic concerns widely influenced the reconstruction of the history of the archdiocese of Methodius. Offering a new reading of already widely-used sources, both Slavonic and Latin, Maddalena Betti turns attention upon the jurisdictional conflict between Rome, the Bavarian churches and Byzantium, in order to uncover the strategies and the languages adopted by the Apostolic See to gain jurisdiction over the new territories in central and south-eastern Europe.

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Walter K. Hanak

In The Nature and the Image of Princely Power in Kievan Rus', 980-1054, Walter K. Hanak offers a critical analysis of the annalistic, literary, and other works that provide rich if conflicting and contradictory information on the nature of princely power and their image or literary representations. The primary sources demonstrate an interaction between the reality and the notions concerning princely power and how this power generates an image of itself. The author also analyses the textual incongruities that appear to be a reflection of a number of currents -- Byzantine, Varangian, Khazar, and Eastern Slavic. The secondary sources provide a variety of interpretations, which Hanak seeks to uphold and dispute. His stress, however, is to view this evidence in the light of a newly Christianized state and the launching of a maturative process in its early history.