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The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons

Circulation, Market, and Consumption of Asian Goods in the Spanish Empire, 1565–1650

Series:

José Luis Gasch-Tomás

Studies of the trade between the Atlantic World and Asia during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries typically focus on the exchanges between Atlantic European countries – especially Portugal, the Netherlands and England – and Asia across the Cape route. In The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons. Circulation, Market, and Consumption of Asian Goods in the Spanish Empire, 1565-1650, José L. Gasch-Tomás offers a new approach to understanding the connections between the Atlantic World and Asia. By drawing attention to the trans-Pacific trade between the Americas and the Philippines, the re-exportation of Asian goods from New Spain to Castile, and the consumption of Chinese silk, Chinese porcelain and Japanese furnishings in New Spain and Seville, this book discloses how New Spanish cities and elites were main components of the spread of taste for Asian goods in the Spanish Empire. This book reveals how New Spanish family and commercial networks channelled the market formation of Asian goods in the Atlantic World around 1600.

A Grammar of Nungon

A Papuan Language of Northeast New Guinea

Series:

Hannah Sarvasy

A Grammar of Nungon is the most comprehensive modern reference grammar of a language of northeast Papua New Guinea. Nungon is a previously-undescribed Finisterre-Huon Papuan language spoken by about 1,000 people in the Saruwaged Mountains, Morobe Province. Hannah Sarvasy provides a rich description of the language in its cultural context, based on original immersion fieldwork. The exposition is extraordinarily thorough, covering phonetics, phonology, word classes, morphology, grammatical relations, switch-reference, valency, complex predicates, clause combining, possession, information structure, and the pragmatics of communication. Four complete interlinearized Nungon monologues and dialogues supplement the copious textual examples. A Grammar of Nungon sets a new standard of thoroughness for reference works on languages of this region.

Edited by Brendan Howe and Boris Kondoch

Peacekeeping and the Asia-Pacific explores the politics, challenges, and future of UN peacekeeping operations from the Asia-Pacific. The first section looks at contributions from the sub-regions: Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. The second section of the book looks at individual country case studies including: Australia, Solomon Islands, Japan, and Thailand. The third, and concluding, section consists of a theoretical summary on the central conceptual theme of Asian motivations for PKO contributions.
This content was originally published in vols. 18:3-4 and 19:3-4 of the Journal of International Peacekeeping.

The Peoples of Northeast Asia through Time

Precolonial Ethnic and Cultural Processes along the Coast between Hokkaido and the Bering Strait

Richard Zgusta

The focus of Richard Zgusta’s The Peoples of Northeast Asia through Time is the formation of indigenous and cultural groups of coastal northeast Asia, including the Ainu, the “Paleoasiatic” peoples, and the Asiatic Eskimo. Most chapters begin with a summary of each culture at the beginning of the colonial era, which is followed by an interdisciplinary reconstruction of prehistoric cultures that have direct ancestor-descendant relationships with the modern ones. An additional chapter presents a comparative discussion of the ethnographic data, including subsistence patterns, material culture, social organization, and religious beliefs, from a diachronic viewpoint. Each chapter includes maps and extensive references.

Series:

Edited by Leong Ko

Translation and interpreting (T/I) and cross-cultural communication activities in the Asia Pacific are unique in that they involve vastly different languages and cultures. Such differences pose challenges for T/I practitioners and researchers as well as scholars of cross-cultural studies. In Translation and Cross-Cultural Communication Studies in the Asia Pacific, Leong Ko and Ping Chen provide a comprehensive and in-depth account of various issues encountered in translation and interpreting activities and cross-cultural communication in the Asia Pacific.

The book covers six areas including translation research from the historical perspective and different issues in translation studies; research on literary translation; studies on translation for special purposes; research on interpreting; translation and interpreting training; and research on issues in cross-cultural communication.

Migration as Transnational Leisure

The Japanese Lifestyle Migrants in Australia

Series:

Jun Nagatomo

In Migration as Transnational Leisure: The Japanese Lifestyle Migrants in Australia Jun Nagatomo discusses a new type of migration in which “lifestyle” is at the core of middle class aspirations to migrate. Traditionally, international migration has been commonly seen as resulting from economic, political and religious causes. However, this book studies an intriguing new dynamic between the social transformation and the Japanese engagement with tourism and migration. Since the 1990s, when Japan was struggling with the recession, increasing numbers of young middle class Japanese began to drift from the safe and assured life course model and chose to live abroad. This book explores how lifestyle values affect migration decision of Japanese migrants in Australia and settlement processes in the migration destination.

Edited by Sjoerd R. Jaarsma

Describing Papua New Guinea, 1945-1975
Interviews on the History of Ethnographic Description (Transcripts)

With few exceptions, the thirty-eight people interviewed were anthropologists, linguists, or geographers, working in an academic environment. Most did their initial (usually post-graduate) research in PNG in the years between 1945 and 1975 – the last decades of Australian colonial rule over the area. In many cases, revisits were made to the areas studied or to other locations in PNG. The interviewees came from Europe, Australia, and Northern America. Twenty-nine of these interviews are reproduced here verbatim.*

Focus of the interviews
While each individual interview deals with the fieldwork of the person or persons interviewed, the overall focus was the circumstances of social scientific research – particularly anthropological research – in PNG. Similarly, from an historical perspective the final decades of colonialism and the subsequent decolonization process of the area were recurring issues in nearly all of the interviews. A third focus of the interviews was the indigenous reaction both to the fact of being researched and to the changing times in which the research subjects lived.

Information from the interviews
Various aspects of the social setting surface throughout the various interviews. The fact that the Australians were working to develop PNG and later on “preparing” it for independence set the stage for part of the research effort. Infrastructure, politics, education, the indigenous reaction to development, all these were prime subjects for research.

Yet, “exploring the unknown” was very real for New Guinea with its extreme and largely uncharted variety of languages and cultures. This happened not just by personal choice, but also in the context of various research programs and projects. Many of the researchers were also at some stage or other involved in looking at the 1964 and 1968 elections in PNG. The choice of research locations in a sense follows the quest for the unknown. All but a few of the people interviewed picked a research location not previously visited or studied. Some even specifically sought to go to the very edges of administrative and missionary influence. In that respect PNG in the 1950s through 1970s still provided that curious challenge: to be the first in the field, meeting people “only minimally affected” by Western culture.

If there ever was such a thing as an ethnographic laboratory where cultures could be studied under “controlled conditions” PNG came very close to it. Researchers looked to minimize outside influences by examining people at the edges of the controlled areas or newly opened-up areas. Whether this worked or not, or even whether it was a sensible approach, will always remain a matter of judgment.

* Interviewer/editor: Sjoerd R. Jaarsma. The interviews were conducted as part of a research project financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, Foundation for Economic, Sociocultural, and Geographical Sciences (ref. 510-76-504). The texts were edited for readability and – where necessary – for the correctness of their content. In all cases, however, corrections were kept to a minimum.

Various Authors & Editors

Memories van Overgave: New Guinea

Retrospective reports by Dutch civil servants in Indonesia, these briefings contain important source materials for those who research local, social, political and economic history of Indonesia. The Memories were used to brief newly appointed officials about their assigned administrative area. They cover the entire Indonesian Archipelago.
IDC Publishers has now selected the Memories pertaining to (Netherlands) New Guinea. This includes reports up to the 1950s and 1960s. The documents provide details of the period in which Dutch authorities attempted to keep New Guinea independent from Indonesia, which had been granted sovereignty in 1949.

Various Authors & Editors

Missionary Archives - Pacific
Australasia

The importance of missionary archives as a primary source continues to grow. IDC Publishers has now selected from a total of nine large missionary archives on microfiche, all materials related to missionary activities in the Pacific. They derive from nine large missionary archives, each item contains a reference to the issuing society or organization. The documents provide details on eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century missionary endeavours of Western Protestant in the Pacific.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Pacific collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Missionary Archives - Pacific
Pacific General

The importance of missionary archives as a primary source continues to grow. IDC Publishers has now selected from a total of nine large missionary archives on microfiche, all materials related to missionary activities in the Pacific. They derive from nine large missionary archives, each item contains a reference to the issuing society or organization. The documents provide details on eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century missionary endeavours of Western Protestant in the Pacific.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Pacific collection.