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American Circumstance

Anniversary Edition

Series:

Patricia Leavy

A Sense Publishers Bestseller!

Paige Michaels comes from the kind of wealth that few experience. The daughter of a notoriously successful banker who wielded great political power, she grew up in an extraordinary world peopled by the political leaders of tomorrow. Now one mistake rooted in her past is threatening to unravel her perfect life. After years as a stay-at-home mother living in New Jersey, Mollie Johnston convinces her husband, Paul, to move back to New York to fulfill her dream of living amid the bright lights. Mollie is uncomfortable in her own body and is always worried about how others perceive her and Paul. Once she sees how the other half lives, will she come to see herself and her marriage more clearly? Gwen McAndrews is the ultimate New York socialite and is the envy of those impressed by her grandeur, but is there more than meets the eye? In addition to Paige, Mollie, and Gwen, a cast of characters’stories are interwoven into the text—parents, children, caretakers, childhood friends, old lovers, and spouses.

Thoroughly copyedited and revised, this Anniversary Edition also includes brand new content: a new chapter titled "The Road Trip" (an epilogue), an afterword, and a further engagement section for book club or class use. The novel can be used as supplemental reading in courses across the disciplines that deal with gender, social class, inequality, power, family systems, relational communication, intimate relationships, identity, American culture, narrative or creative writing. It can also be read in book clubs or entirely for pleasure.

Interpreting the Past

Essays on Human, Primate, and Mammal Evolution

Series:

Edited by Daniel Lieberman, Richard W. Smith and Jay Kelley

This volume, published in honor of the occasion of David Pilbeam's 65th birthday, covers major topics in human, primate, and mammalian evolution, mostly from the Miocene to the present. The papers emphasize novel interpretations of several key areas of longstanding interest and importance, including Miocene biogeography and hominoid evolution, the origins of hominids, and new interpretations of the hominid fossil record.
In terms of content, most of the papers tackle key issues in the evolution of hominoids and hominids in terms of systematic paleoenvironmental and behavioral questions. More broadly, however, the papers explore the epistemological problems of how one interprets the past from the available data.

Edited by Mark Brett

This volume reflects the diversities of culture both within biblical texts and among the interpretative communities for whom the Bible is a focus of thought and action. Part One, Ethnicity in the Bible, explores selected texts from the Hebrew Bible and from the New Testament, making use of methodological perspectives drawn from a range of disciplines. Part Two, Culture and Interpretation, looks at examples of how ethnicity figures both in the use of the Bible by indigenous peoples and in professional biblical interpretation. By collecting a diversity of topics into a single volume, the authors raise fresh questions for subjects that are usually treated in isolation from each other.


This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Pura Besakih

Temple, Religion and Society in Bali

Series:

D.J. Stuart-Fox

Pura Besakih is the paramount Hindu temple on Bali. Located high on the slopes of the volcano Mt Agung, it has developed over more than a thousand years into a great complex of 22 separate temples, the largest and central being Pura Penataran Agung. The annual cycle of more than seventy rituals, which symbolically link the temples into a whole, culminates in the centenary ceremony called Ekadasa Rudra (last held in 1979). The temple complex, state-supported at least since the fifteenth century, has undergone a series of architectural and ritual changes.
This study combines an analysis of textual and historical sources with the fieldwork methods of anthropology in creating a unified interpretation of this great temple.

Series:

J. Rousseau

Kayan Religion is an ethnographic account of the rituals and beliefs of Central Borneo swidden agriculturists, written at the request of the Baluy Kayan of Sarawak to preserve their religion for future generations. With its extensive agricultural rituals, Kayan religion is organized around the agricultural cycle. Both priests and shamans are present; the latter limit themselves to curing rituals, while priests manage the annual cycle, life-cycle rituals, and familial rituals.
Like other groups in Southeast Asia, the Kayan have elaborate death rituals. The traditional Kayan religion ( adat Dipuy) was characterized by ritual head-hunting, animal omens, and a multiplicity of taboos. In the 1940s, a prophet revealed a new religion ( adat Bungan) in Central Borneo, with particular success in the Baluy area. In its initial stage, adat Bungan was a radical rejection of the old religion. However, in just a few years, a kind of counter-reformation occurred, led by aristocrats and priests, who reinstated most of the old rituals in a simplified and less onerous form.

Series:

Edited by Wil Arts and Loek Halman

The comparative method is at the core of sociological inquiry and gained new importance, emphasis and practitioners particularly after the second world war as a consequence of a large variety of international and global scale developments.
The contributions to this book regard nations or countries as contextual units of analysis and treat them as variables. Theoretical explanations are presented of how social phenomena are systematically related to characteristics of the nation states and these explanations are tested empirically using the qualitative tools of mainstream sociology.
The chapters in this book can be useful to a broad audience and a range of social scientists who are interested in the understanding of contemporary social phenomena that are no longer limited to national borders but that are transnational or of a global order.

Contributors are Toril Aalberg, Wil Arts, Carole B. Burgoyne, Loek Halman, Piet Hermkens, Guillermina Jasso, Mebs Kanji, James R. Kluegel, Ola Listhaug, David S. Mason, Petr Matěju, Neil Nevitte, Thorleif Pettersson, David A. Routh, Svetlana Sidorenko-Stephenson, Johan Verweij, Bernd Wegener, and Peter Van Wijck.

Wolves from the Sea

Readings in the Anthropology of the Native Caribbean

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Edited by Neil L. Whitehead

Wolves from the sea brings together the latest work of leading authorities on the archaeology, linguistics, history, and socio-cultural anthropology of native Caribbean groups, particularly that of the Island Carib. In each of these disciplines orthodox theories are critically assessed and new directions for interdisciplinary research suggested.

A central theme that emerges from this volume is the acknowledgement of the plurality of ethnic identities that greeted Columbus and a rejection of the way in which subsequent anthropology has blindly accepted colonial ethnological schema.

The seven contributions in this volume represent the outcome of an international symposium, held in Leiden. The author are Arie Boomert, Berend J. Hoff, Jalil Sued Badillo, Neil L. Whitehead, Peter Hulme, Jay B. Haviser and Charles J.M.R.C. Gullick.

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Edited by H. Geertz

Balinese texts, temples, theatre performances and rituals, in seven essays, are placed into specific political contexts in an effort to gain a deeper understanding of the changing relations between state and society on the complex island of Bali.
How have local communities been linked to various claimants to state sovereignty through Bali's history? What have been the forms and functions of the institutions that have joined peasants with kings and bureaucrats? How have these institutions changed and in what ways have they remained the same over the centuries? How have these relationships been represented by Balinese to themselves? And, how should research on these issues be carried further forward?
The contributors to this volume—I Gusti Ngurah Bagus, Hildred Geertz, Henk Schulte Nordholt, Raechelle Rubinstein, David J. Stuart Fox, Adrian Vickers, and Carol Warren—represent the disciplines of anthropology, literature and history, but all of them cut creatively across disciplinary lines. In contrast to previous Bali research, these studies put more emphasis on historical background and pay close attention to local Balinese perspectives. Early and colonial history form the frame of several papers, while others deal with major changes in the recent past. While each paper taken alone has its own specialized concerns, if the set is read as a series an outline can be discerned, not only of Balinese history and culture, but also of some characteristic features of the new research on Bali being carried out in the 1980s. The interdisciplinary approach of this volume makes it challenging reading for a wider audience of Southeast Asianists.

Sex and Gender

Making Cultural Sense of Civilization

Series:

Hall Thomas Wilson

This book shows how different a focus on gender is from one on sex, whether in scholarly thinking, professional activity or public policy-making. It indicates how incorrect contemporary renditions of the difference between them is, provides an explanation of this tension and difference based on the critical analysis of key institutions, and shows the serious consequences of this confusion for women in particular across a wide range of institutional processes and practices in North America and Western Europe.
This confusion out of the failure to understand adequately the historical origins of sex as a civil designation in a political economy and in state taxation and census concerns, and the corollary determination of spokesmen for the emerging capitalist and industrial nation state to extirpate the last vestiges of gender, given its tie to a pre-industrial kinship system found in towns and local communities.
This is a forcefully written study which integrates material from a vast range of disciplines and professional practices. It also seeks to integrate salient work in women's and feminist studies into a critique of key institutions and practices if advacned industrial societies. it uses critical theory and makes this available to students and practitioners, as well as scholars and academics.