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Edited by Peter von Möllendorff, Annette Simonis and Linda Simonis

Alexander the Great, Caesar, Caligula, Cicero, Cleopatra, Diogenes, Hypatia, Leonidas, Lucretia, Nero, Sappho and Socrates—all famous women and men from Antiquity who have fascinated across the centuries that divide us from them. We encounter them again and again in literature, art, music, film and new media forms such as graphic novels.

The 96 contributions in Brill’s New Pauly Supplement 7: Historical Figures from Antiquity written by an international team of scholars depict the survival of these great characters from Antiquity to the modern world. Each article presents an overview of the latest research on what we know concerning the lives of the historical person or legendary figure and then recounts the reception of these figures throughout history, giving special attention on the viewpoints in the early modern and contemporary periods. Turning the spotlight on the leitmotifs of established images and theories allows the reader to reassess the importance of these figures in our history and culture.
Translated and edited by Duncan A. Smart and Chad M. Schroeder

Personification

Embodying Meaning and Emotion

Series:

Edited by Walter Melion and Bart Ramakers

Personification, or prosopopeia, the rhetorical figure by which something not human is given a human identity or ‘face’, is readily discernible in early modern texts and images, but the figure’s cognitive form and function, its rhetorical and pictorial effects, have rarely elicited sustained scholarly attention. The aim of this volume is to formulate an alternative account of personification, to demonstrate the ingenuity with which this multifaceted device was utilized by late medieval and early modern authors and artists in Italy, France, England, Scotland, and the Low Countries. Personification is susceptible to an approach that balances semiotic analysis, focusing on meaning effects, and phenomenological analysis, focusing on presence effects produced through bodily performance. This dual approach foregrounds the full scope of prosopopoeic discourse—not just the what, but also the how, not only the signified, but also the signifier.