Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 4,206 items for :

  • Historical and Comparative Linguistics & Linguistic Typology x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
In Anatolian Verbal Stem Formation, David Sasseville offers an extensive classification of the Luwian, Lycian and Lydian verbal stem classes. This serves as a basis for reconstructing the Proto-Luwic stage and subsequent comparison with Hittite, providing new insights into the Proto-Anatolian verbal system and by extension into the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European.
Besides its contribution to the study of verbal morphology, the present book also provides significant insights into the philology of the Anatolian languages. The detailed analyses of the synchronic data, including a philological survey of verbal forms and paradigms for the individual stem classes, enhance our understanding of Luwian, Lycian and Lydian and thereby benefit the fields of Hittitology and other studies on the Classical period in Asia Minor.
Editor: Tabea Ihsane
This volume edited by Tabea Ihsane focuses on different aspects of the distribution, semantics, and internal structure of nominal constituents with a “partitive article” in its indefinite interpretation and of potentially corresponding bare nouns. It further deals with diachronic issues, such as grammaticalization and evolution in the use of “partitive articles”.
The outcome is a snapshot of current research into “partitive articles” and the way they relate to bare nouns, in a cross-linguistic perspective and on new data: the research covers noteworthy data (fieldwork data and corpora) from Standard languages - like French and Italian, but also German - to dialectal and regional varieties, including endangered ones like Francoprovençal.
Author: Silvia Luraghi
In Experiential Verbs in Homeric Greek:.A Constructional Approach Silvia Luraghi offers a comprehensive account of construction variation with two-place verbs belonging to different sub-domains of experience (including bodily sensation, perception, cognition, emotion and volitionality) in the Homeric language. Traditionally, variation is ascribed to the independent meaning of cases that mark the second argument, and explanations have focused on properties of the latter. By taking a constructional approach, the author shows that construction variation also brings about differences in the conceptualization of the subject/experiencer by pointing to different degrees of control and awareness. Variation is then shown to reflect the embodied construal of experience along with the social dimension of emotions.
Expressives in the South Asian Linguistic Area offers the first comprehensive account of this important understudied word class from synchronic, diachronic, literary, and descriptive perspectives. The work contains studies from the four major language families of South Asia (Indo-Aryan, Dravidian, Austroasiatic, Tibeto-Burman) and covers domains in semantics, morphosyntax, and phonotactics. It also includes studies from literature and film that show how expressive form and function are embedded in performative contexts. Finally, the volume also contains first of its kind data from several small endangered languages from the region. Proposing an innovative methodology that combines structural and semiotic analysis, the volume advances a more holistic understanding of areal phenomena that departs from previous studies of the South Asian linguistic area.
In A Grammar of Lopit, Jonathan Moodie and Rosey Billington provide the first detailed description of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language traditionally spoken in the Lopit Mountains in South Sudan. Drawing on extensive primary data, the authors describe the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Lopit language. Their analyses offer new insights into phenomena characteristic of Nilo-Saharan languages, such as ‘Advanced Tongue Root’ vowel distinctions, tripartitite number marking, and marked-nominative case systems, and they uncover patterns which are previously unattested within the Eastern Nilotic family, such as a three-way contrast in aspect, number marking with the ‘greater singular’, and two kinds of inclusory constructions. This book offers a significant contribution to the descriptive and typological literature on African languages.
Author: Eric T. Lander
The task of reconstructing the reinforced demonstrative paradigm for early Nordic has been called “impossible” by the eminent Einar Haugen. In The History of the Reinforced Demonstrative in Nordic, Eric Lander aims to accomplish exactly this, by way of an exhaustive study of the pronoun’s attestations in the Viking Age runic inscriptions, which are the earliest forms of this item to be recorded in Scandinavia. The detailed picture of regional variation that emerges is then used to inform reconstructions of the paradigm from Proto-Nordic to Common Nordic. The book represents the first serious attempt in historical-comparative linguistics to grapple with the morphological development of the North-West Germanic reinforced demonstrative since the work of 19th-century scholars like Sophus Bugge.
Two questions lie at the core of current research into discourse structuring: what is the appropriate level of analysis for discourse segmentation and what are the criteria for the identification of basic units in discourse. Linguistic structure – and more precisely, the extraction and integration of syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic information – has shown to be at the center of discourse comprehension. However, its role in the establishment of basic building blocks for a coherent discourse is still a subject to debate. This collection presents current work on theoretical, diachronic, cross-linguistic, as well as experimental research into the identification and marking of discourse units, and into how discourse coherence can be brought about by the basic building blocks of discourse.
This is the first major study of the interplay between Latin and Germanic vernaculars in early medieval records. Building on previous work on the uses of the written word in the early Middle Ages, which has dispelled the myth that this was an age of ‘orality’, the contributions in this volume bring to the fore the crucial question of language choice in the documentary cultures of early medieval societies. Specifically, they examine the interactions between Latin and Germanic vernaculars in the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds and in neighbouring areas. The chapters are underpinned by an important comparative dimension on account of the two regions’ shared linguistic heritage and numerous cross-Channel links.

Contributors are: Stefan Esders, Albert Fenton, Robert Gallagher, Wolfgang Haubrichs, Charles Insley, Kathryn A. Lowe, Rosamond McKitterick, Rory Naismith, Janet L. Nelson, Edward Roberts, Annina Seiler, Marco Stoffella, Francesca Tinti, Kate Wiles, Bernhard Zeller.
Editor: Marc Greenberg
The Vend nyelvtan is a grammar completed in 1942 by the linguist Avgust Pavel that was designed to serve as a modern standard for the Prekmurje Slovenes who were to be subjects of Hungary. Though the grammar was meant to divide the Prekmurje Slovenes from the Slovenes of Yugoslavia, it was never put into use. Today it serves as a reflection of the lexical and grammatical peculiarities of the Prekmurje dialect as it was spoken during Pavel’s lifetime (1886–1946). The English translation of the grammar, originally written in Hungarian, offers linguists insight into a key part of the remarkable variation in Slovene. A peripheral area of Slovene, the Prekmurje dialect is in contact with German, Hungarian, and Croatian Kajkavian.