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Language and Politics of the Ummah in the Qurʾan
Author: Hamza Zafer
In Ecumenical Community, Hamza M. Zafer explores the language and politics of community-formation in the Qurʾan. Zafer proposes that ecumenism, or the inclusivity of social difference, was a key alliance-building strategy in the western Arabian proto-Muslim communitarian movement (1st/7th century). The Proto-Muslims imagined that their pietistic community—the ummah—transcended but did not efface prior social differences based in class, clan, and custom. In highlighting the inclusive orientation of the Qurʾan's ummah-building program, Zafer provides new insights into the development of early Islam and the period preceding the Arab conquests.
A Critical Edition, with an English Translation, Based on All the Known Judaeo-Arabic Manuscripts. Cambridge Genizah Studies Series Volume 11
Kitāb al-mustalḥaq is an addendum to the treatises on Hebrew morphology by Ḥayyūǧ, the most classic of the Andalusi works written during the caliphate of Cordoba and the benchmark for studies of the Hebrew language throughout the Arabic-speaking world during the medieval period. Kitāb al-mustalḥaq was composed in Zaragoza by Ibn Ǧanāḥ after the civil war was unleashed in Cordoba in 1013. This new edition includes an historical introduction, taking account of the major contributions from the twentieth century to the present day, a description of the methodology and contents of this treatise, a description of the manuscripts, and a glossary of terminology. This new edition shows how Ibn Ǧanāḥ updated his book until the end of his life.
In: Kitāb al-mustalḥaq by Ibn Ǧanāḥ of Cordoba
In: Kitāb al-mustalḥaq by Ibn Ǧanāḥ of Cordoba
In: Kitāb al-mustalḥaq by Ibn Ǧanāḥ of Cordoba
In: Kitāb al-mustalḥaq by Ibn Ǧanāḥ of Cordoba
In: Kitāb al-mustalḥaq by Ibn Ǧanāḥ of Cordoba
Author: Aviv Schoenfeld

Abstract

This paper analyzes Biblical Hebrew personal names like ʔăḇīšay ‘Abishai’ and dɔ̄niyyēl ‘Daniel’, names that are made of two primary elements that are related to meaningful elements from outside the domain of personal names. I argue that these names are best analyzed as a case of lexical secreted affixation, such that their recurring element is a derivational affix for deriving personal names. Furthermore, I argue that the medial vowel, occurring in the middle of ʔăḇīšay and dɔ̄niyyēl, is an underlying part of the affixes, such that they are /ʔabi-/ and /-iʔel/. An Optimality-theoretic account is given for the allomorphy of the Yahwistic suffix and variable occurrence of the medial vowel. Lastly, I argue that these affixes diachronically originate from blend and clitic group names that were morphologically reanalyzed to include an affix.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Edit Doron

Abstract

The paper proposes that the same functional categories which determine the inflection of the Biblical Hebrew finite verb also determine the feature specification of the Biblical Hebrew infinitive. This proposal depends both on demonstrating that the infinitive is a verb, rather than a noun (or a verbal noun), as traditionally assumed, and on showing that the functional categories that embed the infinitive are clausal rather than nominal. The article starts by examining the traditional distinction between the Infinitive Absolute and Infinitive Construct, and makes an argument for a single infinitive, with two allomorphs. The former is a verb marked as [+Mood], while the latter is marked as [–Mood], and both are also specified for two other clausal functional categories: T and Asp/Mod. These two latter categories determine a 4-way classification of finite/infinitival verbs: [+T+Asp/Mod], [+T–Asp/Mod], [–T+Asp/Mod], [–T–Asp/Mod]. This classification determines a concomitant 4-way alternation of attachment options of subject and/or object clitics to the verb: [+subj.cl.+Obj.cl.], [+subj.cl.–Obj.cl.], [–subj.cl.+Obj.cl.], [–subj.cl.–Obj.cl.], and moreover accounts for the distribution of the different verb forms.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics