Browse results

Boaz Shoshan

In Damascus Life 1480-1500: A Report of a Local Notary Boaz Shoshan offers a microhistory of the largest Syrian city at the end of the Mamluk period and on the eve of the Ottoman conquest. Mainly based on a partly preserved diary, the earliest available of its kind and written by Ibn Ṭawq, a local notary, it portrays the life of a lower middle class who originated from the countryside and who, through marriage, was able to become a legal clerk and associate with scholars and bureaucrats. His diary does not only provide us with unique information on his family, social circle and the general situation in Damascus, but it also sheds light on subjects of which little is known, such as the functioning of the legal system, marriage and divorce, bourgeois property and the mores of the common people.

Christián H. Ricci

New Voices of Muslim North-African Migrants in Europe captures the experience in writing of a fast growing number of individuals belonging to migrant communities in Europe. The book follows attempts to transform postcolonial literary studies into a comparative, translingual, and supranational project. Cristián H. Ricci frames Moroccan literature written in European languages within the ampler context of borderland studies. The author addresses the realm of a literature that has been practically absent from the field of postcolonial literary studies (i.e. Neerlandophone or Gay Muslim literature). The book also converses with other minor literatures and theories from Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as Asians and Latino/as in the Americas that combine histories of colonization, labor migration, and enforced exile.

Africa Yearbook Volume 15

Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2018

Edited by Victor Adetula, Benedikt Kamski, Andreas Mehler and Henning Melber

The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.

Edited by Kate Fleet, Gudrun Krämer, Denis Matringe, John Nawas and Everett Rowson

The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Part 2019-6 of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam will contain 57 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.

Reinventing Jihād

Jihād Ideology From the Conquest of Jerusalem to the end of the Ayyūbids (c. 492/1099–647/1249)

Series:

Kenneth A. Goudie

In Reinventing Jihād, Kenneth A. Goudie provides a detailed examination of the development of jihād ideology from the Conquest of Jerusalem to the end of the Ayyūbids (c. 492/1099–647/1249). By analysing the writings of three scholars - Abū al Ḥasan al Sulamī (d. 500/1106), Ibn ʿAsākir (d. 571/1176), and ʿIzz al-Dīn al-Sulamī (d. 660/1262) - Reinventing Jihād demonstrates that the discourse on jihād was much broader than previously thought, and that authors interwove a range of different understandings of jihād in their attempts to encourage jihād against the Franks. More importantly, Reinventing Jihad demonstrates that whilst the practice of jihād did not begin in earnest until the middle of the twelfth century, the same cannot be said about jihād ideology: interest in jihād ideology was reinvigorated almost from the moment of the arrival of the Franks.

Edited by Kate Fleet, Gudrun Krämer, Denis Matringe, John Nawas and Everett Rowson

The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Yearbook of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam contains 266 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.

Edited by Kate Fleet, Gudrun Krämer, Denis Matringe, John Nawas and Everett Rowson

The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Part 2019-5 of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam will contain 58 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.

Edited by Kate Fleet, Gudrun Krämer, Denis Matringe, John Nawas and Everett Rowson

The Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam appears in substantial segments each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century and of Muslim minorities all over the world.
This Yearbook of the Third Edition of Brill’s Encyclopaedia of Islam contains 282 new articles, reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship in the fields of Islamic Studies.

al-Ṣiqillī or al-Ṣaqalī / Sicily or Tunisia?

Ink Recipes from the Western Regions of Islamic Lands

Arianna D’Ottone Rambach

Abstract

This article reconsiders the text and the authorship of an anonymous Arabic manuscript containing ink recipes. The text was first published by Eugenio Griffini in 1910, but the ink recipes have only recently attracted scholarly attention. Though the latest contributions on the manuscript consider it lost, it is in fact preserved at the Ambrosiana Library. Attributed to ‘the Sicilian’, an anonymous author, it is possible that it is the work of a 15th-century physician from Tunis. Griffini edited the text, but images of the manuscript are published here for the first time, as well as an English translation and a new edition. For comparison, other ink recipes, from a sixteenth-century manuscript in maghribī script are edited and translated as well.