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Author: Peter Beilharz
Karl Marx circles us, and we him. This reflects the power of his legacy, but it also indicates the nature of the intellectual process. We move around objects of interest and insight, working by successive approximations. Peter Beilharz has been circling Marx for forty years. This volume of essays expands the metaphor by working through three circles in the history of Marxism. The first works with Marx; the second with the classical legacy, through to Bolshevism and western marxism ; the third steps closer to the present , in thinkers such as Bauman , Heller and Castoriadis. Read together, these essays represent a lifetime’s engagement with Marx and his intellectual consequences.
This reference book provides the reader with an exhaustive array of epistemological, theoretical, and empirical explorations related to the field of cosmopolitanism studies. It considers the cosmopolitan perspective rather as a relevant approach to the understanding of some major issues related to globalization than as a subfield of global studies. In this unique contribution to conceptualizing, establishing, experiencing, and challenging cosmopolitanism, each chapter seizes the paradoxical dialectic of opening up and closing up, of enlightenment and counter-enlightenment, of hope and despair at work in the global world, while the volume as a whole insists on the moral, intellectual, structural, and historical resources that still make cosmopolitanism a real possibility—and not just wishful thinking—even in these hard times.

Contributors include: John Agnew, Daniele Archibugi, Paul Bagguley, Esperança Bielsa, Estevão Bosco, Stéphane Chauvier, Daniel Chernilo, Vincenzo Cicchelli, Vittorio Cotesta, Stéphane Dufoix, David Held, Robert Holton, Yasmin Hussain, David Inglis, Lauren Langman, Pietro Maffettone, Sylvie Mesure, Magdalena Nowicka, Sylvie Octobre, Delphine Pagès-El Karaoui, Massimo Pendenza, Alain Policar, Frédéric Ramel, Laurence Roulleau-Berger, Hiro Saito, Camille Schmoll, Bryan S. Turner, Clive Walker, Daniel J. Whelan.
This book constitutes a sociological research on the current “narrations” of the economic and refugee crisis which has mobilized all the aspects of social storytelling during the last decade, most particularly in the European South. Because the different (mass and social) media reflect the dominant ideas and representations, the research on the meaning of different media narratives becomes a necessary report for the understanding of the relation (or “inexistent dialogue”?) between official political discourses and popular myths (based on everyday life values of prosperity, mostly promoted by the mass culture and the cultural industries’ products). Despite the ongoing inequalities and difficulties, the contemporary audiences seem to counterbalance misery by the dreams of happiness, provided by this kind of products.

Contributors include: Christiana Constantopoulou, Amalia Frangiskou, Evangelia Kalerante, Laurence Larochelle, Debora Marcucci, Valentina Marinescu, Albertina Pretto, Maria Thanopoulou, Joanna Tsiganou, Vasilis Vamvakas, and Eleni Zyga.
This volume in political epistemology offers a comprehensive discussion of the multiple applicability of Gramscian concepts and categories to the historical, sociological, and cultural analysis of science. Key notions such as ‘cultural hegemony’, and the role of ‘organic intellectuals’ (scientists, experts, popularizers, educators, decision makers) in ‘civil society’ help to articulate new approaches for understanding the interplay between epistemic dynamics and power relationships in science, technology, and society. The perspective of hegemony and subalternity allows us to critically assess the political directedness of scientific practices as well as to reflect on the ideological status of disciplines that deal with science at a meta-level—historical, socio-historical, and epistemological.

Contributors include: Javier Balsa, Lino Camprubí, Ana Carneiro, Luís Miguel Carolino, Riccardo, Ciavolella, Maria Paula Diogo, Isabel Jiménez Lucena, Annelies Lannoy, Jorge Molero Mesa, Nieto-Galan Agustí, Pietro Daniel Omodeo, Matteo Realdi, Arne Schirrmacher, Ana Simões, Carlos Tabernero Holgado, Carlos Ziller Camenietzki.
Ecuador’s “Good Living”: Crises, Discourse, and Law by Gallegos-Anda, presents a critical approach towards the concept of Buen Vivir that was included in Ecuador’s 2008 Constitution. Due to its apparent legal novelty, this normative formula received much praise from multiple civil society and academic circles by forging what some argued to be a new development paradigm based on Andean epistemologies. Gallegos-Anda theorizes this important phenomenon through an inductive analysis of context and power relations. Through a masterful navigation through epistemological fields, the author offers a critical theory of Buen Vivir that focuses on changing citizenship regimes, a retreating state, politicised ethnic cleavages, discursive democracy and the emergence of an empty signifier. Gallegos-Anda is the first to situate Buen Vivir in a theoretical context grounded in international human rights law.
Author: Eugen Varga
Editor: André Mommen
Born in 1879, Eugen Varga would become the most prominent Marxist economist in the Soviet Union – ‘Stalin’s economist’. This volume contains a wide and representative selection of his works, dating from his entry into the Hungarian Communist Party in 1919 through to his criticisms of John Maynard Keynes in the 1950s. It includes the entire text of his Economic Problems of the Proletarian Dictatorship, according to Lenin probably the best work on the collapse of the revolutionary government in Hungary. A detailed critical introduction by Varga’s biographer, André Mommen, supplies valuable background detail on the circumstances of Varga’s work, contextualising it in relation to political events and the development of orthodox economic theory in the USSR.
This volume critically examines gender inequality, its origins, and its social and economic implications in Latin America, with a particular focus on Ecuador. For that purpose, Pablo Quiñonez and Claudia Maldonado-Erazo bring together a collection of articles that provide insights from different disciplines, including political economy, history, development studies, political science, microeconomics, and macroeconomics.

In Ecuador, as in Latin America as a whole, women dedicate more time than men to unpaid activities while being discriminated against in multiple areas, including labor markets, politics, and access to high-ranking positions. Furthermore, these problems are even greater for women from rural areas and ethnic minorities.

Contributors include: Rafael Alvarado, María Anchundia Places, Esteban Arévalo, Diana Cabrera Montecé, Edwin Espinoza Piguave, Gabriela Gallardo, Danny Granda, Claudia Maldonado-Erazo, Wendy Mora, Diana Morán Chiquito, Sayonara Morejón, Carlos Moreno-Hurtado, María Moreno Zea, Ana Oña Macías, Pablo Ponce, Pablo Quiñonez, Valeria Recalde, Josefina Rosales, Ximena Songor-Jaramillo, and Daniel Zea
Essays on the Political Economy of Late Development
Growth and Change in Neoliberal Capitalism brings together selected essays written by Alfredo Saad-Filho, one of the most prominent Marxist political economists today. This book offers a rich analysis of long-term economic development in the current stage of capitalism, the new relations of dependence between countries, the prospects for poor countries, and the progressive alternatives to neoliberalism. The volume also provides a detailed set of studies of the political economy of Brazil, tracking its achievements, tragedies, contradictions and limitations from the economic transition to from import-substituting industrialisation to neoliberalism, and from military dictatorship to democracy, in order to explain the catastrophes currently unfolding in that country.