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Edemilson Paraná

In Digitalized Finance, Edemilson Paraná investigates the relationship between the development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and the process of financialization of economies on a global scale, particularly in Brazil. The book explains the influence of ICT in the emergence and consolidation, especially from the 1980s, of new forms of operation and management of the globalized financial system, highly connected, operated in “real time” with intensive use of technological features, and how these advances are related with the economic and social changes in question. It also describes how contemporary capital markets work, where the search for earnings is leveraged by sophisticated mathematical models, robots and automated trading software that seek financial gains in the milliseconds scale.

Series:

Edited by Charles Padrón and Krzysztof Piotr Skowroński

With The Life of Reason in an Age of Terrorism, Charles Padrón and Kris Skowroński (editors) gather together a broad assortment of contributions that address the germaneness of George Santayana’s (1863-1952) social and political thought to the world of the early twenty-first century in general, and specifically to the phenomenon of terrorism.

The essays treat a broad range of philosophical and historical concerns: the life of reason, the philosophy of the everyday, fanaticism, liberalism, barbarism, egoism, and relativism. The essays reflect a wide range of viewpoints and perspectives, but all coalesce around discussions of how Santayana’s thought fits in with and enhances an understanding of both our challenging times, and our uncertain future.

Contributors are: Cayetano Estébanez, Matthew Caleb Flamm, Nóra Horváth, Jacquelyn Ann Kegley, Till Kinzel, Katarzyna Kremplewska, John Lachs, José Beltrán Llavador, Eduardo Mendieta, Daniel Moreno Moreno, Luka Nikolic, Charles Padrón, Giuseppe Patella, Daniel Pinkas, Herman Saatkamp, Jr., Matteo Santarelli, Krzysztof Piotr Skowroński and Andrés Tutor.

Series:

Eduardo Mendieta

Abstract:

George Santayana lived through one of the bloodiest centuries in human history, one in which we also reached the heights of human destructiveness and racially driven genocide. This text evaluates Santayana’s contribution, or lack thereof, to the thinking of war in human history. It is argued that Santayana naturalizes, ontologizes, and in the end, offers a theodicy for the exculpation and acceptance of war. Thus, it is argued that philosophy must raise itself up to the technological and political situations that give rise to new forms of violence that, if not as momentous as those of the last century, should also command our moral and philosophical consideration. It is in this vein that the author argues that one of the most important challenges presently to philosophy and political morality are military drones and how they are reconfiguring what a battlefield is and what “collateral casualties” are acceptable. Here, the drone is considered from the perspective of thanatology, the production of death of some lives for the sake of other lives, while also considering the paradox of the fundamental asymmetries in the so-called “global war on terror.” While considering modern terrorism, the essay engages the argument that drones are not simply weapons of war, but also political devices. Drones affect the way we are governed and allow ourselves to be governed. The drone is also a weapon of political destruction, a key device in necropolitics.

Series:

Giuseppe Patella

Abstract:

This paper aims to discuss the idea that barbarism is not a condition of the past concerning ancient peoples, but rather a central component of any civilization, to the extent that no one is ever completely immune and emancipated from it. Barbarism is also a status of the mind when it falls prey to uncontrollable passions and fancies, exactly as barbarians do. In this sense, according to Santayana, the barbaric could be defined as a vision of art based on a purely lyrical and sentimental affection, on a chaotic and indistinct stream of consciousness, ignoring the reasons for actions, and indulging in a state of abundance of expressions without organization, perceptions without control, and sentimental stupor. Barbarism is thus precisely that penchant to believe that art is an independent and concluded field, impervious to nature and separated from life and other human activities.