Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,391 items for :

  • Higher Education x
  • 限定主要语言: English x
Clear All
How can African philosophy of education contribute to contemporary debates in the context of complexities, dilemmas and uncertainties in African higher education? The capacity for self-reflection, self-evaluation and self-criticism enables African philosophy of higher education to examine and re-examine itself in the context of current issues in African higher education. The reflective capacity is in line with the Socratic dictum ‘know thy self.’ African Higher Education in the 21st Century: Epistemological, Ontological and Ethical Perspectives responds to the demands for reflection and self-knowledge by drawing from ontology, epistemology and ethics in an attempt to address issues that affect African higher education as they connect with the past, present and future.
International Educationalist Perspectives
Editor: Brent Bradford
The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.
Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology
In Introduction to Africana Demography: Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology scholars from across the country wed Black Sociology with critical demography within an Africana Demography framework. Contributors speak to innovative ways to address pressing issues and have the added benefit of affording many of the scholars denied their rightful place in the sociological and demographic canons. Specifically, the book includes an introduction outlining Africana demography and chapters that provide a critique of conventional demographic approaches to understanding race and social institutions, such as the family, religion, and the criminal justice system.


Contributors include: Lori Latrice Martin, Anthony Hill, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Maretta McDonald, Weldon McWilliams, Jack S. Monell, Edward Muhammad, Brianne Painia, Tifanie Pulley, David I. Rudder, Jas M. Sullivan, Arthur Whaley, and Deadric Williams.
From the 16th through to the 18th century, printed disputations were the main academic output of universities. This genre is especially attractive as it deals with the most significant cultural and scientific innovations of the early modern period, such as the printing revolution and the development of new methods in philosophy, education and scholarly exchange via personal networks.
Until recently, academic disputations have attracted comparatively little scholarly attention. This volume provides for the first time a comprehensive study of the early modern disputation culture, both through theoretical discussions and overviews, and numerous case studies that analyze particular features of disputations in various European regions.
Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance
Globalization, massification of tertiary education, and ICT revolution have radically altered the tertiary education environment posing new challenges to governments, higher education providers and other key stakeholders in terms of relevance and credibility of provisions. With the radical alterations it became clear that the traditional means for internal and external evaluations are no longer adequate to ensure the acceptable level of tertiary education performance to meet the society development needs. Considering one of the primary roles of quality assurance in tertiary education is ensuring relevance and credibility of tertiary education provisions to the ever-changing needs of the macro world of industry, politics and society at large, more and more governments are currently prioritizing quality assurance to drive the required changes in governance of higher educatuon systems, mutual recognition across national borders, and accountability to the public in different parts of the world.

As part of its mission, the INQAAHE has undertaken a Global Study of both external and internal quality assurance developments worldwide in cooperation with the regional QA networks (e.g. ENQA, CANQATE, APQN, ANQAHE, CEENQA) in 2017–2018. The regions covered in this scoping study are as follows: Africa, the Arab Region, Asia-Pacific, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Northern America.

Global Trends in Higher Education Quality Assurance: Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance provides a comprehensive coverage of the trends and developments in higher education quality assurance as they refer to legitimacy/trust, efficiency and relevance.
A Biographical Account of Racial, Class, and Gender Inequities in the Americas
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.
The Art of Writing for Educators
Writing in Education: The Art of Writing for Educators focuses on educators’ professional journeys and discoveries about teaching, learning, writing, and self. This book offers insightful discussions about teaching practices, reflective writing, and digital and nondigital representations of meaning. It explores practical matters facing teachers and teacher candidates, such as communicating about one’s practice, writing beyond content and page, or conducting classroom observations and maintaining field notes. This volume is divided into three main parts, each of which spotlights a Featured Assignment that examines an area of writing in education. The sample student work that is highlighted in each chapter is designed to support teachers and teacher candidates as they consider the importance and forms of writing as professionals in the field, as well as the roles of writing in their own current or future classrooms.
In Critical Reflection on Research in Teaching and Learning, the editors bring together a collection of works that explore a wide range of concerns related to questions of researching teaching and learning in higher education and shine a light on the diversity of qualitative methods in practice. This book uniquely focuses on reflections of practice where researchers expose aspects of their work that might otherwise fit neatly into ‘traditional’ methodologies chapters or essays, but are nonetheless instructive – issues, events, and thoughts that deserve to be highlighted rather than buried in a footnote. This collection serves to make accessible the importance of teaching and learning issues related to learners, teachers, and a variety of contexts in which education work happens.

Contributors are: David Andrews, Candace D. Bloomquist, Agnes Bosanquet, Beverley Hamilton, Henriette Tolstrup Holmegaard, Klodiana Kolomitro, Minna Körkkö, Outi Kyrö-Ämmälä, Suvi Lakkala, Rod Lane, Corinne Laverty, Elizabeth Lee, Narelle Patton, Jessica Raffoul, Nicola Simmons, Jee Su Suh, Kim West, and Cherie Woolmer.
In Educating for Social Justice: Field Notes from Rural Communities, educators from across the United States offer their experiences engaging in rural, place-based social justice education. With education settings ranging from university campuses in Georgia to small villages in New Mexico, each chapter details the stories of teaching and learning within the often-overlooked rural areas of the United States.

Attempting to highlight the experiences of rural educators, this text explores the triumphs, challenges, and hopes of teachers who strive to implement justice pedagogy in their rural settings.

Contributors are: Carey E. Andrzejewski, Hannah Carson Baggett, Sarah N. Baquet, T. Jameson Brewer, Brianna Brown, Christian D. Chan, Elizabeth Churape-García, Jason Collins, María Isabel Cortés-Zamora, Jacqueline Daniel, Joanna Davis-McElligatt, Katy Farber, Derek R. Ford, Sheri C. Hardee, Jehan Hill, Lynn Liao Hodge, Renee C. Howells, Adam W. Jordan, Rosann Kent, Shea N. Kerkhoff, Jeffery B. Knapp, Peggy Larrick, Leni Marshall, Kelly L. McFaden, Morgan Moore, Kaitlinn Morin, Nora Nuñez-Gonzalez, Daniel Paulson, Emma Redden, Angela Redondo, Gregory Samuels, Hiller Spires, Ashley Walther, Serena M. Wilcox, Madison Wolter, and Sharon Wright.
Delivering Flexibility in Learning through Online Learning Communities
Flexibility has long been a feature of the delivery of learning in higher education, particularly with the rise in importance of technology in giving learners greater choice over when, where and how they engage in learning. Recent analysis has sought to look beyond its significance in learning delivery to its value as a personal attribute of both learners and educators. Flexibility is now a key feature of debates addressing the role of universities in producing graduates with the capability to become change agents in increasingly dynamic workplaces and the wider world.

Flexibility and Pedagogy in Higher Education explores flexibility in learning in the context of online learning communities, in relation to the delivery of learning and as a means of promoting the development of flexibility as a personal attribute. Essays draw on examples involving students from foundation up to postgraduate level in curricular and co-curricular settings.

The essays collected in this volume examine the practical application of flexibility in learning through the use of online learning communities. It provides best practice examples for educators looking to use innovative pedagogies to develop flexible learning experiences, thereby building on recent studies on the place of flexibility in the future development of higher education.