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Der Kaiser war der Bevölkerung im Römischen Reich auf vielfältige Weise präsent, durch Statuen auf öffentlichen Plätzen, sein Bildnis auf Münzen oder seinen Namen in Inschriften. Dabei waren seine Untertanen nicht nur Rezipienten kaiserlicher Selbstdarstellung, sondern beteiligten sich auch aktiv an der Ausgestaltung der kaiserlichen Repräsentation mit ihren eigenen Vorstellungen und Erwartungen. Dieses Thema wird in Dialogangebote. Die Anrede des Kaisers jenseits der offiziellen Titulatur erstmals am Beispiel der sog. inoffiziellen Titulaturen auf breiter Quellenbasis untersucht. Dabei werden diese ehrenden Epitheta in ihrer diachronen Entwicklung von Augustus bis Severus Alexander (27 v. Chr. – 235 n. Chr.) und ihren thematischen, medialen, funktionalen und sozialen Kontexten analysiert. Die Untersuchung arbeitet die wichtige Rolle der Untertanen für die Herrscherrepräsentation heraus und bietet neue Einblicke in die Bedeutung dieses Phänomens für die reziproke Kommunikation zwischen Kaiser und Untertanen.

The people of the Roman Empire encountered the emperor in many different ways, such as through statues in public places, his portrait on coins or his name in inscriptions. In these encounters, his subjects were not merely recipients of imperial self-expression, but also expressed their own ideas and expectations. Dialogangebote. Die Anrede des Kaisers jenseits der offiziellen Titulatur is the first study of this dynamic to make use of the rich Latin and Greek source material for the so-called unofficial titulature. These honorific epithets are analysed in their diachronic development from Augustus to Severus Alexander (27 BCE – 235 CE) and discussed in their thematic, media, functional and social contexts. The study fleshes out the important role played by the subjects in the representation of rulers and offers new insights into the importance of this phenomenon for the reciprocal communication between emperors and subjects.
Author: Amanda Jo Coles
The Romans founded colonies throughout Italy and the provinces from the early Republic through the high Empire. Far from being mere ‘bulwarks of empire,’ these colonies were established by diverse groups or magistrates for a range of reasons that responded to the cultural and political problems faced by the contemporary Roman state and populace. This project traces the diachronic changes in colonial foundation practices by contextualizing the literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and numismatic evidence with the overall perspective that evidence from one period of colonization should not be used analogistically to explain gaps in the evidence for a different period. The Roman colonies were not necessarily ‘little Romes,’ either structurally, juridically, or religiously, and therefore their role in the spread of Roman culture or the exercise of Roman imperialism was more complex than is sometimes acknowledged.
Author: Amanda Jo Coles

Abstract

The Romans founded colonies throughout Italy and the provinces from the early Republic through the high Empire. Far from being mere ‘bulwarks of empire,’ these colonies were established by diverse groups or magistrates for a range of reasons that responded to the cultural and political problems faced by the contemporary Roman state and populace. This project traces the diachronic changes in colonial foundation practices by contextualizing the literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and numismatic evidence with the overall perspective that evidence from one period of colonization should not be used analogistically to explain gaps in the evidence for a different period. The Roman colonies were not necessarily ‘little Romes,’ either structurally, juridically, or religiously, and therefore their role in the spread of Roman culture was more complex than is sometimes acknowledged.

In: Roman Colonies in Republic and Empire
Author: Daniel Moore
The Greek historian Polybius (2nd century B.C.E.) produced an authoritative history of Rome’s rise to dominance in the Mediterranean that was explicitly designed to convey valuable lessons to future generations. But throughout this history, Polybius repeatedly emphasizes the incomparable value of first-hand, practical experience. In Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History, Daniel Walker Moore shows how Polybius integrates these two apparently competing concepts in a way that affects not just his educational philosophy but the construction of his historical narrative. The manner in which figures such as Hannibal, Scipio Africanus, or even the Romans as a whole learn and develop over the course of Polybius’ narrative becomes a critical factor in Rome’s ultimate success.
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History
In: Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History