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Edited by Samantha Kahn Herrick

Hagiography and the History of Latin Christendom, 500-1500 shows the scholarly value of texts celebrating saints—both the most abundant medieval source material and among the most difficult to use. Hagiographical sources present many challenges: they are usually anonymous, often hard to date, full of topoi, and unstable. Moreover, they are generally not what we would consider as factually accurate. The volume’s twenty-one contributions draw on a range of disciplines and employ a variety of innovative methods to address these challenges and reach new discoveries about the medieval world that extend well beyond the study of sanctity. They show the rich potential of hagiography to enhance our knowledge of that world, and some of the ways to unlock it.
Contributors are Ellen Arnold, Helen Birkett, Edina Bozoky, Emma Campbell, Adrian Cornell du Houx, David Defries, Albrecht Diem, Cynthia Hahn, Samantha Kahn Herrick, J.K. Kitchen, Jamie Kreiner, Klaus Krönert, Mathew Kuefler, Katherine J. Lewis, Giovanni Paolo Maggioni, Charles Mériaux, Paul Oldfield, Sara Ritchey, Catherine Saucier, Laura Ackerman Smoller, and Ineke van ‘t Spijker.

Christ, Mary, and the Saints

Reading Religious Subjects in Medieval and Renaissance Spain

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Edited by Andrew M. Beresford and Lesley K. Twomey

The last decade has witnessed a striking upsurge of interest in Iberian hagiography. In painting and the fine arts through to poetic and narrative treatments composed in Castilian and Catalan, the legacies of Christ, Mary, and the saints have been approached from a range of perspectives and subjected to detailed critical scrutiny. This book, which focuses specifically on the application of theoretical and methodological approaches to analysis, asks what scholars of early Iberian hagiography can bring to the analysis of the sacred past and how the study of the discipline can be taken forward innovatively in the future. Its fourteen essays, each focusing on a different aspect of composition, seek in particular to explore interdisciplinary methodologies and the ways in which they intersect with broader discourses in other branches of research.
Contributors are Carme Arronis Llopis, Fernando Baños Vallejo, Andrew M. Beresford, Sarah Jane Boss, Sarah V. Buxton, Marinela Garcia Sempere, Ryan D. Giles, Ariel Guiance, Lluís Ramon i Ferrer, Rebeca Sanmartín Bastida, Connie L. Scarborough, and Lesley K. Twomey.

Series:

Edited by Andrew M. Beresford and Lesley K. Twomey

1 Conflict and Collaboration

The Inquisition in Rome and the Papal Territories (1550–1750)

Series:

Irene Fosi

Abstract

This chapter focuses the attention on the city of Rome and some regions and towns of the Papal States from the late sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century. The aim is to underline the conflicts and interrelations between the Inquisition and other central tribunals (such as those of the Governor, and of the Cardinal Vicar), local bishops and governors and the role played by officers in the Roman tribunal and in the inner peripheral ones. In this diversified context, drawing largely on unpublished archival material, my paper is intended to elucidate the collaboration/opposition with local episcopal courts and the provincial inquisitorial world and his staff, to verify the gap between theory and practice, between Roman, central policy and the actual practice. How deep and incisive the inquisitorial control was in a peculiar context like the Eternal City and the Papal States?