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Tazul Islam

Abstract

The Quranic discourse on Christians is paradoxical because its narratives express both compliments and condemnation, reproach and rapprochement. Scholars debate the sentiments behind the Quranic assertion that Christians are “certainly nearest in friendship” to the Muslim believers (Q 5:82). While some believe that this forms an incentive for rapprochement between Muslims and Christians, others interpret it in completely the opposite way. As such, this study aims to answer the fundamental question of whether Christian-Muslim friendship is possible. To come to a conclusion, it will examine the pros and cons of Christian-Muslim friendship that are detailed in both classical and modern exegeses concerning the nature of such friendship, the reasons behind it, and the identity of the friendly Christians mentioned in the Quran. It is expected that the result of this study will contribute to revising current understanding of Christian-Muslim relations.

Nurulwahidah Fauzi, Khadher Ahmad and Wan Noor Azila Binti Wan Kamaruzaman

Abstract

Fever is one of the body’s natural responses to any virus or bacterial infection. In the hadith, fever is described as being a compassionate spark made from fire, proof of which is that fever is caused by body heat. Using both inductive and deductive methodologies, this article seeks to provide a comparative examination of fever from the perspective both of hadith and of the discussions contained within a Malay medical text. This study, on the sources of al-Kutub al-sitta, has found that there are nine hadiths that expound on fever and its treatment, and that these can be divided into two main types: [1] those that view fever as a disease and then show the most suitable methods for treatment, including treatment techniques, the reading of appropriate ruqya, and the most suitable materials for so doing; and [2] those that present fever as being the eternal removal of sin by Allah. On the other hand, the Malay medical manuscript Kitab Bermacam-Macam Khasiat explains fever and its various types, how to treat fever using herbs, and its use as a means for healing. From the similarities between the hadith that are discussed here and the Malay medical text, it can be seen that the primary means for treating fever is through the use of water. In terms of medical philosophy, the Prophet SAW gave and emphasised a single-compound treatment method, whereas Malay medical manuscripts place more emphasis on mixed-compound treatments. In order to explain the hadith, our analysis has found that it is suggested that prayers or specific ruqya in which our submission of hope to Allah are employed, while Malay medical manuscripts help highlight the experience and knowledge of herbal remedies within the community and how such treatments have been passed from one generation to the next.

Mohd Faizal Kasmani, Sofia Hayati Yusoff and Osama Kanaker

Abstract

Speech-act theory allows us to study how words have an impact in real life and the performative nature of words. At the same time, it can also contribute to an understanding of communication style and communication strategy. In this article, speech-act theory is applied to the conversations of Prophet Muḥammad with the Bedouin in two ways. First, the speech acts of the Prophet are analyzed using the categories put forward by John Searle to see how they function within the conversation. Second, the illocutionary force of an utterance and its perlocutionary effect – based on words and expressions that the Prophet used in his utterances – are examined to discover patterns in his communication strategy towards the Bedouin.

Asmawati Muhamad, Abdul Halim Syihab and Meguellati Achour

Abstract

The contemporary discourse of environmental sustainability has many values embedded in the teachings of the Quran and Sunna. The general outlook of the Quranic paradigm on utilizing the natural environment is based on the prohibition of aggression and misuse, as well as being founded on ideas of construction and sustainability. Unfortunately, in the contemporary world the Muslim community fails to pay sufficient attention to the relevant instructions in the Quran and Sunna. Thus, this article attempts to expand on key concepts within the Quran and Sunna which reveal the most important values for environmental sustainability. The research methodology employed in this paper is an analytical study of a number of Quranic verses with a particular focus on tafsīr bi al-maʾṯūr (explanation based on hadith), tafsīr bi al-raʾyi (explanation based on reason), and historical narrative. In short, this paper brings to light the importance of relevant classical and contemporary Quran and Sunna studies for improving human-nature relations and coexistence.

Faoziya S.M. Musbah

Abstract

Al-Iḫlāṣ is an important chapter within the Holy Quran (words of God) because it is a brief declaration of the absolute unity of God (Allah). This paper analyzes al-Iḫlāṣ mathematically in order to gain an understanding of the relationship between the letters of this chapter and their iterations. The analyzed two-dimensional data points (xi,yi) define a piecewise linear curve that is shaped like Allah’s name as it is written in Arabic. The B-spline function is used to analyze this data so as to obtain a second degree curve.

Series:

Edited by Eric F. Mason and Edmondo F. Lupieri

The seventeen studies in Golden Calf Traditions in Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam explore the biblical origins of the golden calf story in Exodus, Deuteronomy, and 1 Kings, as well as its reception in a variety of sources: Hebrew Scriptures (Hosea, Jeremiah, Psalms, Nehemiah), Second Temple Judaism (Animal Apocalypse, Pseudo-Philo, Philo, Josephus), rabbinic Judaism, the New Testament (Acts, Paul, Hebrews, Revelation) and early Christianity (among Greek, Latin, and Syriac writers), as well as the Qur’an and Islamic literature. Expert contributors explore how each ancient author engaged with the calf traditions—whether explicitly, implicitly, or by clearly and consciously avoiding them—and elucidate how the story was used both negatively and positively for didactic, allegorical, polemical, and even apologetic purposes.

Tafsir as Mystical Experience: Intimacy and Ecstasy in Quran Commentary

Tafsīr sūrat al-baqara by Sayyid ʿAlī Muḥammad Shīrāzī, The Báb (1819-1850)

Series:

Todd Lawson

In Tafsir as Mystical Experience, Todd Lawson shows how the Quran may be engaged with for meaning and understanding, the usual goal of mystical exegesis, and also how it may be engaged with through tafsīr in a quest for spiritual or mystical experience. In this earliest of the Báb’s extended works, written before his public claim to be the return of the hidden Imam, the act of reading is shown to be something akin to holy communion in which the sacred text is both entrance upon and destination of the mystic quest. The Quran here is a door to an “abode of glory” and an abiding spiritual encounter with the divine through the prophet, his daughter Fāṭima and the twelve Imams of Ithna-ʿasharī Shiʿism who inhabit the letters, words, verses and suras of the Book.

Cover calligraphy by Burhan Zahrai of Quran 53:11

Entering the House of Glory

Exegesis as Mystical Intimacy with the Divine

Series:

Todd Lawson

Heptads

Architecture of Glory, II

Series:

Todd Lawson