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Edited by Johan H. Winkelman and Gerhard Wolf

Essays on the Song Cycle and on Defining the Field

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, 1999

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Edited by Walter Bernhart and Werner Wolf

This volume assembles twelve interdisciplinary essays that were originally presented at the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, in 1999, a conference organized by the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA).
The contributions to this volume focus on two centres of interest. The first deals with general issues of literature and music relations from culturalist, historical, reception-aesthetic and cognitive points of view. It covers issues such as conceptual problems in devising transdisciplinary histories of both arts, cultural functions of opera as a means of reflecting postcolonial national identity, the problem of verbalizing musical experience in nineteenth-century aesthetics and of understanding reception processes triggered by musicalized fiction.
The second centre of interest deals with a specific genre of vocal music as an obvious area of word and music interaction, namely the song cycle. As a musico-literary genre, the song cycle not only permits explorations of relations between text and music in individual songs but also raises the question if, and to what extent words and/or music contribute to creating a larger unity beyond the limits of single songs. Elucidating both of these issues with stimulating diversity the essays in this section highlight classic nineteenth- and twentieth-century song cycles by Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, Hugo Wolf, Richard Strauss and Benjamin Britten and also include the discussion of a modern successor of the song cycle, the concept album as part of today’s popular culture.

Across the Lines

Intertextuality and Transcultural Communication in the New Literatures in English

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Edited by Wolfgang Klooss

This third volume of ASNEL Papers covers a wide range of theoretical and thematic approaches to the subject of intertextuality. Intertextual relations between oral and written versions of literature, text and performance, as well as problems emerging from media transitions, regionally instructed forms of intertextuality, and the works of individual authors are equally dealt with. Intertextuality as both a creative and a critical practice frequently exposes the essential arbitrariness of literary and cultural manifestations that have become canonized. The transformation and transfer of meanings which accompanies any crossing between texts rests not least on the nature of the artistic corpus embodied in the general framework of historically and socially determined cultural traditions. Traditions, however, result from selective forms of perception; they are as much inventions as they are based on exclusion. Intertextuality leads to a constant reinforcement of tradition, while, at the same time, intertextual relations between the new literatures and other English-language literatures are all too obvious. Despite the inevitable impact of tradition, the new literatures tend to employ a dynamic reading of culture which fosters social process and transition, thus promoting transcultural rather than intercultural modes of communication. Writing and reading across borders becomes a dialogue which reveals both differences and similarities. More than a decolonizing form of deconstruction, intertextuality is a strategy for communicating meaning across cultural boundaries.

Interart Poetics

Essays on the Interrelations of the Arts and Media

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Edited by Ulla-Britta Lagerroth, Hans Lund and Erik Hedling

In this anthology are gathered 28 essays, devoted to the interrelations of the arts and media. They present together the current state of the emerging field of Interart Studies. The contributors — Stephen Greenblatt, Claus Clüver, Erika Fischer-Lichte, John Neubauer, Steven Paul Scher, Walter Bernhart, Ulrich Weisstein, Eric T. Haskell, Eric Vos, Thomas Elsaesser, among others — are leading international scholars in the fields of Art History, Literary Criticism, Musicology, Film, Theatre and Media Studies. In challenging ways they promote interdisciplinary strategies in the study of the traditional arts: dance, literature, music, painting, sculpture, theatre etc, as well as of the modern media: film, TV, video, computer-generated arts, etc.
The essays collected engage in a broad perspective of topics, approached from varying theoretical, methodological or ideological viewpoints. No single thread runs through the diversely conceived essays, yet it is evident that what all contributors appear to envision is the importance today of investigations into the problems of what might be called the interart — or intermedia — discourse. Aimed at university teachers, scholars, students and even artists, this book will meet the demands from those interested in modern modes of interart and intermedia analysis.

Text into Image

Image into Text

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Edited by Jeff Morrison and Florian Krobb

Text into Image: Image into Text is a truly interdisciplinary publication. Whilst all of the contributions focus upon the central problem of the relationship between literature and the visual arts — one which has lost nothing of its fascination as the debate has expanded in numerous forms from antiquity into the realm of postmodern theory — they come from contributors working in a large number of different areas. Represented are academics from the worlds of German Studies, French Studies, English Studies, Art History and Film Studies. Given their backgrounds each of the contributors can offer a different perspective upon the core issue of translation between media, but perhaps most valuable is the com-bination of perspectives made possible by the arrangement of the volume into sections dealing with aspects of the image/text debate. In the same way that the volume gains by ranging across traditional disciplinary boundaries so it also gains from dealing with a wide range of historical material from — to take only one possible route — Baroque icono-graphy through Romantic imagery to Expressionist agony.