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The Fall of Great Moravia

Who Was Buried in Grave H153 at Pohansko near Břeclav?

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Edited by Jiri Machacek and Martin Wihoda

The excavated foundations of a ninth-century sacral building in the northeastern suburb of Pohansko, an important centre of Great Moravia, and especially the find of the nobleman’s grave H 153, has focused scholarly attention onto the nature of the Mojmirid state and the reasons behind its sudden disintegration. In this volume, a group of archaeologists, historians and a natural scientist aim to incorporate this remarkable discovery into the wider frameworks of Moravian power, society, and culture, and thereby arrive at some surprising conclusions.

Contributors: are Stefan Eichert, David Kalhous, Pavel Kouřil, Jiří Macháček, Vladimír Sládek, Ivo Štefan, Martin Wihoda, Roman Zehetmayer.

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Gerol’d I. Vzdornov

Translator Valerii G. Dereviagin

Series-editor Marybeth Sollins

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Gerol’d I. Vzdornov

Translator Valerii G. Dereviagin

Series-editor Marybeth Sollins

Series:

Gerol’d I. Vzdornov

Translator Valerii G. Dereviagin

Series-editor Marybeth Sollins

Series:

Gerol’d I. Vzdornov

Translator Valerii G. Dereviagin

Series-editor Marybeth Sollins

Series:

Gerol’d I. Vzdornov

Translator Valerii G. Dereviagin

Series-editor Marybeth Sollins

Art for the Workers

Proletarian Art and Festive Decorations of Petrograd, 1917-1920

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Natalia Murray

Art for the workers explores the mythology and reality of post-revolutionary proletarian art in Russia as well as its expression in the festive decorations of Petrograd between 1917 and 1920. It covers this brief period chronologically, and so permits a close inspection of the development of artistic policies in Russia under the Provisional Government followed by the Bolsheviks. Specifically, this book focuses on the pre-and post-revolutionary debate about the nature of proletarian art and its role in the new Socialist society, particularly focusing on festive decorations, parades and mass performances as expressions of proletarian art and forms of propaganda.


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Mikhail Lifshitz

Mikhail Lifshitz is a major forgotten figure in the tradition of Marxist philosophy and art history. A significant influence on Lukács, and the dedicatee of his The Young Hegel, as well as an unsurpassed scholar of Marx and Engels’s writings on art and a lifelong controversialist, Lifshitz’s work dealt with topics as various as the philosophy of Marx and the pop aesthetics of Andy Warhol. The Crisis of Ugliness (originally published in Russian by Iskusstvo, 1968), published here in English for the first time, and with a detailed introduction by its translator David Riff, is a compact broadside against modernism in the visual arts that nevertheless resists the dogmatic complacencies of Stalinist aesthetics. Its reentry into English debates on the history of Soviet aesthetics promises to re-orient our sense of the basic coordinates of a Marxist art theory.