Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • Modernist Studies x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Patrick McCabe’s Ireland

The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood

Series:

Edited by Jennifer Keating

Few contemporary Irish writers have been more attuned to the historical influence of partition on Ireland’s culture and literary representation than Patrick McCabe. In the recent context of Brexit, his work produced in the late nineteen nineties and early two-thousands carries considerable poignancy, especially in relation to the Catholic Church, gender roles and persistence of a history of violence in Ireland. This volume attends to three novels, The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood as an emblematic representation of Ireland in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Contributors are: K. Brisley Brennan, Aisling Cormack, Flore Coulouma, Luke Gibbons, Lindsay Haney, Barbara Hoffmann, Jennifer Keating, James F. Knapp, Colin MacCabe, Kristina Varade.

Series:

Luke Gibbons

Abstract

A psychoanalytic reading of Patrick McCabe’s novel and screen adaptation of The Butcher Boy suggests that the degeneration of Francie’s family unit betrays the effects of cultural and political violence in Ireland’s history. A compromised relationship, particularly between Francie and his mother, demonstrates the fragility of his psyche leading to the horrific murder of Mrs. Nugent. The familial relationship is read in the context of traumatic societal strife in twentieth century Irish and wider post World War ii European contexts.

Series:

Flore Coulouma

Abstract

Legacies of globalization, colonialism and individual alienation are explored in the context of Patrick McCabe’s Mondo Desperado. Framed within the context of The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto, Mondo is explored as an example of modernity’s infringement on mythological notions of a pastoral Ireland. Colonial contexts, rising global economies and the absurdities therein are explored in this chapter.

Series:

Barbara M. Hoffmann

Abstract

Patrick McCabe’s Francie Brady is read against his precedent, in James Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus, to explore the deterministic factors in mid-twentieth century Irish history that lead to madness instead of artistry in fiction protagonists. Motifs of cultural paralysis, exile, endemic cultural violence and the influence of the Catholic Church are each examined in this essay.

Series:

James F. Knapp

Abstract

Illustrations of varied worlds are the central focus of this essay, drawing on the philosophical precedents offered by Leibniz, Lewis and Irish nationalists like Duffy as frameworks for exploring Patrick McCabe’s Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood. A historical context documenting the rise and fall of the Irish economy, cycles of violence and abuses in the Catholic Church suggest the variety of worlds McCabe both creates and suggests in the context of his fiction.

Series:

K. Brisley Brennan

Abstract

The “social fantastic” illustrated in Patrick McCabe’s novels serves to illuminate violence and horror as social experiences, which take on an aesthetic form in the literature and demonstrate the political and religious extremes that have shaped Irish culture amid a history of colonialism and globalization. It is a context that produces characters like Francie Brady and Pussy Braden, which are at once emblematic of endemic cultural violence and examples of efforts to escape such cycles.

Series:

Aisling B. Cormack

Abstract

This essay explores Ireland’s divisive legacy of partition in the context of Patrick McCabe’s novels, teasing out the inheritance of violence, political strife and individual negotiations of cultural identity. Features of Clones, County Monaghan are also analyzed in McCabe’s fiction to determine the lasting societal effects of this violent history.