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Abstract

The aim of this article is to determine the linguistic status of German in medieval Kraków. In order to do justice to this task, progressive and regressive moments in the syntactic development of German in the medieval Polish capital city of Kraków are compared against linguistic material from Wrocław, which had already been Germanised in the late Middle Ages, with the resulting differences between the two varieties of German and their potential causes being analysed. The corpus texts were selected according to spatio-temporal criteria as well as according to the criterion of text type affiliation. The thesis commonly held in Polish research that the German used in Kraków did not participate in the syntactic developments of German as a whole due to its status as a language enclave is questioned in this study.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

This article establishes a connection between the fairy Mären Das Schneekind and Die Suche nach dem glücklichen Ehepaar. The solution presented in the book of penance for a wife with an illegitimate child comes up against the limits set by the cuckolded husband in the fairy Märe Das Schneekind. It is as it were a critique of the preachers’ approach and also shows the limits of the church in what many consider to be private matters. The other fairy Märe reveals the truth behind the seemingly happy marriage. It shows the consequences of the impossible divorce, but also the obviously wrong concept of honor in society. Both fairy Mären do not show a path to happiness and also demonstrate the unchristian end as a solution to the problem.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
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Abstract

This article deals with the terms for ‘hill, hillock’ in Dutch and German. The common word in Modern Dutch (heuvel) has equivalents in Old Dutch and Old Saxon, especially in place names. The claim that it was imported into Dutch from eastern dialects is untenable. It is more likely that it originated in a Frankish dialect. In Modern German the term Bühel was generally used until it was replaced by the younger form Hügel, orginating in the Low or Middle German. It is furthermore suggested that the forms *huƀil-, *hugil- and *hukil- ‘hill, hillock’ are variants of one and the same word in the various dialects of Dutch and Low German.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik