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Author: Lorenzo Lanti

Summary

More than 430 fragments contained in the Theodosian Code can be traced back to laws by Honorius. The reason for this immense amount of costitutiones is to be found in the variety of issues he had to face during his rather long empire (395–423). Beyond those passed down in official Codes, a number of other laws issued under Honorius are attested by literary or historical sources. The purpose of this paper is to present, analyze and comment on the Epistula Honorii, a quite neglected rescript copied down in a Spanish volume of miscellaneous manuscripts from the end of the 10th century. The document, addressed to troops stationed in the city of Pamplona, grants certain benefits to these soldiers, namely an increase of their stipendium and the hospitium. After focusing on its dating and the problematic interpretation of its text, it will be compared to other laws by Honorius on similar topics.

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'histoire du droit / The Legal History Review
Author: R. Perani

Summary

Creditor fructus percepit, On pledge with a pactum antichreticum. – May the pledgee take the benefits of the res? Pledge did not allow it, there would have been theft (furtum usus). In fact, the thing given as pledge was excluded from any economic use. However, Roman law attests an agreement called ἀντίχρησις, which allowed the creditor to have the fruits of the res, under some conditions. Among the jurists only Marcianus uses this Greek term (in D.13,7,33 and D.20,1,11,1).

In this paper, I wish to demonstrate that the antichresis has become part of Roman legal thought. The legal sources attest a late appearance of the antichresis (very late 2nd and early 3rd century AD), but some Severian constitutions suggest that it may already have been known in practice. The Greek word indicated its foreign origin, but Roman jurists called it simply pignus.

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'histoire du droit / The Legal History Review

Abstract

In conjunction with the plan of Tiberio Alfarano (1590), the designs in the codex Arch. Cap. S. Pietro A. 64ter are the most important source for drawings of the ancient Vatican basilica. This large-format Album is associated with the cleric Giacomo Grimaldi (1568-1623), who placed autograph notes on the folia of the two main series of drawings. Previously known as libri picturarum, the two collections were achieved by Domenico Tasselli da Lugo (1578-1630) and other professional illustrators a short time before the Constantinian basilica was demolished. Starting from the reconstruction of the dramatic historical circumstances for a documentary enterprise that was without precedent, this study examines the Album’s images in an innovative way, making use of the opportunities presented by the digitalization of the manuscript. By means of the reconstruction of the ancient foliation of the paper together with an evaluation of an earlier parchment illustration that in 1592 documented the apse mosaic of St. Peter’s before its destruction, this contribution sheds new light on the structure of the “watercolor book” by Domenico Tasselli (1606), on the original nature of the second set of drawings (1609), and on the important role that Giacomo Grimaldi played in a documentary project “in pictura et scriptura” that was quite modern in its form.

In: The Vatican Library Review

Abstract

The recent digital cataloguing of the “fondo Capponi” has brought to light an important manuscript, Cappon. 227, that has been unstudied until now. This manuscript emerges as an unicum in a collection marked especially by its taste for antiquity, epigraphy and collections of drawings. The parchment codex in fact mostly consists of a corpus of remarkable illustrations. According to the recent iconographic study by François Avril, the narrative scheme, clearly of a Gothic-like transalpine taste, is related to the chivalric novel of Tristan. The book entered the collection of Marquis Alessandro Gregorio Capponi by means of the cleric Feliciano Bussi, as evidenced by some Epistles that the he addresses to the Marquis. The purchase of a codex with almost no text, but with very rich illustrations, denotes an evident interest on the part of Capponi for such illuminations. The choice of this pioneering enterprise, combined with other evidence, e.g., that of the contemporary Vittorio Giovardi, testifies to the existence of a market already specifically devoted to illuminated manuscripts by the first half of the 18th century.

In: The Vatican Library Review
Author: Jacques Jouanna

Abstract

The object of this communication is to contribute to a rehabilitation of the Presbeutikos of Hippocrates generally considered since Littré as a legendary writing on the life of Hippocrates. Since Littré, the archaeological and epigraphic discoveries on Delphi have provided the Presbeutikos with anchoring points in reality. Three stages were important : a first, dating from the first half of the 20th century, due to Hans Pomtow, a second in the second half of the 20th century, due to Jean Bousquet and a third stage at the start of the 21st century due to Denis Rousset. These advances due to archaeologists must be put in relation with the advances of philologists which are not negligible either on the edition of the Presbeutikos after Émile Littré, in particular by the examination of the Ionian vocabulary of this speech including the rare words, which are hapax in the Hippocratic Corpus and are also attested in Herodotus. The language of Presbeutikos, by its antiquity, differs from that of more recent Letters.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Giovanna Casali

Abstract

When Ettore Romagnoli was invited in 1914 to stage classical dramas for the ancient Greek theatre of Syracuse, he attempted to re-create their ancient original characteristics, i.e. a combination of poetry, music, and dance. One of Romagnoli’s aims was to create music for contemporary plays, which recalled ancient Greek music, and he succeeded thanks to the collaboration with the composer Giuseppe Mulè. Indeed, for all the tragedies, Mulè and Romagnoli aimed at re-enacting ancient Greek music. This paper will highlight how both authors pursued their ambitious goal following different criteria: the re-elaboration of particular elements of Sicilian folk music; the re-creation of pieces inspired by both the description of Greek music in ancient sources and the musical fragments; the use of instruments which can reproduce specific sound effects.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies
Author: Vito Lorusso

Abstract

The article presents new information on the history of the Greek manuscript Vallicellanus B 93 and an essay of textual analysis of the Aristotelian and Galenic psychological texts it contains.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Luigi Orlandi

Abstract

This paper aims to shed light on the history of a book mentioned in the will of Theodoros Gazes, which has not been identified so far. It is a manuscript of Galen’s Methodus medendi. A combined palaeographic, philological, codicological and prosopographic analysis of some extant witnesses to the text leads to a tentative identification of the book belonged to Gazes, providing insights into the transmission of Galen’s work in the frame of the Italian Humanism.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

The special part of Galen’s treatise on drug lore, i.e. books 6–11, known by its Latin title De simplicium medicamentorum facultatibus, were accessible to medieval readers first of all in the Latin versions of the second book of Oribasius’ Euporista. These deserve our interest not least because they transmit additional Galenic material not found in either of the two much later Greek mss. of Oribasius’ Euporista or in his Collectiones medicae, book 15, of which book 2 of the Euporista is usually considered an abridgment. Problems of the complex transmission are highlighted in the discussion of a few examples that sometimes go beyond Oribasius and extend to Odo of Meung’s extremely popular poem on drugs in Latin hexameters (11th c., known as Macer Floridus) and the herbal composed by Rufinus (13th c.).

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Lara Pagani

Abstract

Through the analysis of selected passages from the Homeric scholia and an ancient hypomnema, this paper aims to show that in the Hellenistic Age the idea that literary texts had been formerly written using orthographic systems different from the current one triggered the discussion and favoured the solution of some textual issues. At the time of Aristarchus of Samothrace and Crates of Mallos the identification of potential corruptions on the basis of writing features of the exemplar was definitely one of the tools available for the textual constitution of the Homeric poems (maybe the same holds true already for Aristophanes of Byzantium). This suggests that the Hellenistic scholars based their editorial work on conceptual premises that are the fundamentals of an acquainted approach to the transmission of the texts.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"