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East Asian Comparative Literature and Culture responds to the urgent need for a more complex understanding and appreciation of this region by publishing substantial comparative research on the literary and cultural traditions of East Asia and their relation to the world. We showcase original research on the methodology and practice of comparison, including intra- and trans-regional comparisons of China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; explorations of entanglements and mutual representations of Western and East Asian traditions; examinations of the relationship between the East Asian Sinographic Sphere and non-Sinographic textual cultures such as Manchu, Uyghur, and Tibetan; and multipolar comparisons that examine East Asian literatures and cultures in the light of their relations with South and Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Africa, or Latin America.

The series focuses on the interpretive sciences, namely core humanities disciplines such as literature, history, religion, philosophy and thought, art history, musicology, performance or media studies. It also welcomes contributions adopting culturally-informed approaches in archeology, historical geography, anthropology, political science, sociology, or linguistics. Our historical moment demands that we as scholars combine comparative analysis with the depth of area-study-expertise and philology, theoretical acumen, and a courageous orientation towards the exploration of fundamental questions that matter to us today. This is the tall order that this book series and the authors we feature are taking on. We are confident, however, that East Asian Comparative Literature and Culture will enable a deeper mutual understanding, and successfully integrate knowledge about and approaches to different literary and cultural traditions through critical comparative examination. We see clearly the relevance of the humanities to the world we are living in now, and aim to make significant contributions to humanistic scholarship and, ultimately, to the creation of a less divisive, more equal, and better world for all.

Series Editors' Foreword


Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Stephanie Carta and Masja Horn.

Please see our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. All submissions are subject to a double-anonymous peer review process prior to publication.
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
Editor / Translator:
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
The Experiences of International and Domestic Students Studying in an Australian University
Volume Editor:
Eight international and four domestic doctoral students share the story of completing their doctoral journey at an Australian university, as well as their experiences of being part of a large collaborative research group that served as a source of support and motivation on their doctoral journey. They share their dreams, hopes, and frustrations of searching, applying, being rejected and finally accepted as a doctoral candidate. International students share their impressions and experiences of being in a new land with a new language and immersing themselves and their families in a distinctly different culture and society. These are the stories of the challenges they encountered and their struggles and successes.

Contributors are: Elizabeth Allotta, Laura Emily Clark, Maria Ejlertsen, Daeul Jeong, Solange Lima, Huifang Liu, Mohammad Tareque Rahman, Umme Salma, Margaret Schuls, Sara Haghighi Siahgorabi, Lauren Thomasse and Tran Le Nghi Tran.
Free access
In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

Abstract

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, artists could not perform live at music venues, and online performance on social media platforms has become an ordinary event. This transition from the physical stage to virtual platforms benefited many artists and audiences. However, it has also raised some questions about the music industry and its impacts on musicians. Through an autoethnographic analysis of my experience as an independent Filipino musician delivering livestreamed performances during the pandemic, this paper analyzes the constraints – personal, technological, and performative – on musicians in doing online gigs on social media. I also show the relationship between these constraints and the larger issues of inequality and vulnerability among musicians. The discussion is reflexive, as it presents the sociological underpinnings of online gigs by amateur and independent musicians. The paper also describes opportunities and inequalities created by online livestreaming, especially during the pandemic.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author:

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of Facebook by cultural professionals in Vietnam to maintain connections with their audiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Facebook provided a simple and free way of maintaining connections with audiences at a time of increased pressure to shift and adapt to online work immediately. However, concerns have emerged about the nature of arts-centred endeavours that are at odds with this for-profit platform and the production of digital culture in the Global South via a Western platform. The investigation uses findings from 50 semi-structured interviews with cultural professionals and a digital ethnography of seven art organizations’ Facebook posts over two months. It highlights that the Covid-19 pandemic propelled a paradigm shift in how cultural professionals communicated with their audiences via Facebook. These shifts have longer and broader implications for the future of work in the cultural sector, both in Asia and globally.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia