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The objective of this book is to trace the changes in the industrial structure of Delhi from 1951 to 2014 and the implications these have for the forms of working-class resistance in the capital. The first main problem was to identify the characteristic features of the period of so-called ‘regulation accumulation’, i.e., the period from 1951 to 1975; the period of crisis in this regime of accumulation and mode of regulation between the mid-1960s and 1975; the period of unsystematic ruptures from 1975 to 1979; the period of ‘liberalization by stealth’ in the 1980s; and finally the period of full-throttle liberalization from 1991 to 2014, in the general context of India and in the particular context of Delhi. The second problem was to trace the historical changes in the forms of working-class movement which broadly correspond to the changes in the mode of regulation and regime of accumulation from 1951 to 2014. From the general level of determination, the research proceeds to locate these changes in the specific context of the working-class movement of Delhi. In order to accomplish this task, a few case studies are taken. For the period between 1951 and the mid-1990s, the research studies the contours of the Delhi Textile Workers’ Movement, which was a typical organized workers’ movement. It then analyzes three informal/unorganized workers’ movements of Delhi from the new millennium: Almond Workers’ Movement, DMRC Contract Workers’ Movement, and Wazirpur Steel Workers’ Movement. Finally, it probes the changes in the forms of working-class resistance from the period of ‘regulation accumulation’ to that of neoliberal globalization. Further, the shift from workplace-organizing to neighbourhood-based organizing with increasing informalization, economism to political unionism, legalism to going beyond legalism and new forms of protest, organization and resistance are studied and results are summarized.

In: In the Valley of Historical Time
Author:

Abstract

The objective of this book is to trace the changes in the industrial structure of Delhi from 1951 to 2014 and the implications these have for the forms of working-class resistance in the capital. The first main problem was to identify the characteristic features of the period of so-called ‘regulation accumulation’, i.e., the period from 1951 to 1975; the period of crisis in this regime of accumulation and mode of regulation between the mid-1960s and 1975; the period of unsystematic ruptures from 1975 to 1979; the period of ‘liberalization by stealth’ in the 1980s; and finally the period of full-throttle liberalization from 1991 to 2014, in the general context of India and in the particular context of Delhi. The second problem was to trace the historical changes in the forms of working-class movement which broadly correspond to the changes in the mode of regulation and regime of accumulation from 1951 to 2014. From the general level of determination, the research proceeds to locate these changes in the specific context of the working-class movement of Delhi. In order to accomplish this task, a few case studies are taken. For the period between 1951 and the mid-1990s, the research studies the contours of the Delhi Textile Workers’ Movement, which was a typical organized workers’ movement. It then analyzes three informal/unorganized workers’ movements of Delhi from the new millennium: Almond Workers’ Movement, DMRC Contract Workers’ Movement, and Wazirpur Steel Workers’ Movement. Finally, it probes the changes in the forms of working-class resistance from the period of ‘regulation accumulation’ to that of neoliberal globalization. Further, the shift from workplace-organizing to neighbourhood-based organizing with increasing informalization, economism to political unionism, legalism to going beyond legalism and new forms of protest, organization and resistance are studied and results are summarized.

In: In the Valley of Historical Time
Author:

Abstract

The objective of this book is to trace the changes in the industrial structure of Delhi from 1951 to 2014 and the implications these have for the forms of working-class resistance in the capital. The first main problem was to identify the characteristic features of the period of so-called ‘regulation accumulation’, i.e., the period from 1951 to 1975; the period of crisis in this regime of accumulation and mode of regulation between the mid-1960s and 1975; the period of unsystematic ruptures from 1975 to 1979; the period of ‘liberalization by stealth’ in the 1980s; and finally the period of full-throttle liberalization from 1991 to 2014, in the general context of India and in the particular context of Delhi. The second problem was to trace the historical changes in the forms of working-class movement which broadly correspond to the changes in the mode of regulation and regime of accumulation from 1951 to 2014. From the general level of determination, the research proceeds to locate these changes in the specific context of the working-class movement of Delhi. In order to accomplish this task, a few case studies are taken. For the period between 1951 and the mid-1990s, the research studies the contours of the Delhi Textile Workers’ Movement, which was a typical organized workers’ movement. It then analyzes three informal/unorganized workers’ movements of Delhi from the new millennium: Almond Workers’ Movement, DMRC Contract Workers’ Movement, and Wazirpur Steel Workers’ Movement. Finally, it probes the changes in the forms of working-class resistance from the period of ‘regulation accumulation’ to that of neoliberal globalization. Further, the shift from workplace-organizing to neighbourhood-based organizing with increasing informalization, economism to political unionism, legalism to going beyond legalism and new forms of protest, organization and resistance are studied and results are summarized.

In: In the Valley of Historical Time