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In: Asian International Studies Review
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Abstract

Since 1980, Thailand’s monarchy and military have enjoyed a partnership of power with the latter as a junior affiliate — a highly “monarchized military.” However, after 1992, direct military influence across the country diminished, and after the 2006 and 2014 coups, the military regained enormous clout. The country’s post-2019 facade democracy represents the continuation of a tutelary regime involving palace-endorsed military intervention in politics and apparent electoral governance. However, the armed forces-influenced government faces growing domestic challenges. This study examines Thailand’s military in late 2023. 2023 was profoundly significant because a new civilian government entered office that year, which might challenge monarchy-military primacy. The study chiefly asks: To what extent has the monarchy-military partnership clothed itself under the appearance of democracy (while indirectly interfering in it) to sustain its power, and what are the principal challenges this partnership faces? The study finds that in late 2023, Thailand remained a façade democracy, characterized by electoral authoritarianism and lorded over by monarchy and military — a situation the two institutions preferred to maintain.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

This study evaluates the effects of the Cambodia Rural Development Program, specifically focusing on income generation and social capital. By employing a difference- in-differences framework and propensity score matching, the study finds a statistically significant positive impact on income, primarily driven by increased engagement in regular income-generating activities. However, the study also finds that the program has a limited effect on village-level collective actions, social cohesion, and perceived safety while inadvertently discouraging financial contributions to community projects. Additionally, trust between villagers and government officials remains unchanged. Heterogeneous analyses reveal the ineffective participation of trauma-experienced subgroups, highlighting the need for tailored approaches in conflict-affected regions.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

The rapid industrialization of countries in East Asia and the resulting labor shortage are challenging established theories in research on migration policy. Studies argue that the persistence of temporary labor migration programs in this region contests the liberal convergence thesis, which suggests that democratization inevitably leads to more open migration policies. This article revisits the theoretical debate, focusing on conceptual equivalence across time and space. In a comparative policy study of Japan and Korea, we examine the development of two temporary labor migration programs (the Specified Skilled Worker program and the Employment Permit System). Our findings demonstrate how migration policies alternately intersect and diverge throughout time and across policy dimensions. The article contributes to comparative research in migration policy by highlighting the significance of historically informed and empirically equivalent analysis of migration policies.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic affected border management policies by introducing health protocol norms for foreigners entering the country. Although public rhetoric often emphasized the importance of preventing an increase in imported cases, the implementation of health protocols in Indonesian border management policy varied from long quarantine periods during the advent of the pandemic to the easing of border control during the Omicron spike. This paper is focused on the international and domestic dynamics that affected the meaning and implementation of health protocols in Indonesia’s border management policies. It was found that, although international health norms served as initial guidance for health protocols at the start of the pandemic, their influence faded over time as they did not align with the national agenda, which prioritized economic growth. Therefore, after successfully adapting to the pandemic, the president and his elite circle redefined health protocols to favor the economic recovery process.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

The paper presents the first comprehensive analysis of all episodes of backsliding in democratic regimes in Indo-Pacific Asia from 1950–2022. Based on the experience of this sample of cases, this paper aims to generate insights into why some Asian democracies are more resilient to this gradual decline in the quality of democratic institutions. Using Haggard and Kaufman’s framework of the “weak democracy syndrome” and the three different kinds of mechanisms of accountability that, in theory, can beat democratic backsliding, our analysis aims to show not only how but also when different accountability mechanisms succeed or fail in stopping autocratization.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

This paper discusses the etymological status of the Amuric noun *ŋa ‘animal’, which is attested in the modern Amuric languages (Nivkh and Nighvng) both as an independent noun and as an element forming the final component of the names of several animal species. In the latter position, it has the synchronic variants and -ŋi ~ -ŋaj, which on the basis of external and internal evidence may be traced back to *-ŋa and *-ŋa-j, respectively. An identical element ŋa-, with the synchronic variants ŋə- and ŋ-, is also attested as the initial component of several other items denoting, in particular, parts of both the human and the animal body. The etymological analysis of these Amuric lexemes was first taken up by Robert Austerlitz, who postulated an original basic lexeme *ŋa with the meaning ‘living matter’. In the present paper the relevant lexical material is reviewed once again in the light of recent developments in the field of Amuric historical phonology.

In: International Journal of Eurasian Linguistics

Abstract

How and when did domestic donkeys arrive in China? This article sets out to uncover the donkeys’ forgotten trail from West Asia across the Iranian plateau to China, using archaeological, art historical, philological, and linguistic evidence. Following Parpola and Janhunen’s (2011) contribution to our understanding of the Indian wild ass and Mitchell’s (2018) overview of the history of the domestic donkey in West Asia and the Mediterranean, we will attempt to shed light on the transmission of the beast of burden to Eastern Eurasia.

Due to its length, the paper is published in two instalments: Part I covers archaeological, art historical and textual evidence for the earliest occurrence and popularization of donkeys in China. Part II (in the fall issue) contains three sections: Two sections explore possible etymologies of ancient zoonyms for donkeys or donkey-like animals in Iranian and Chinese languages respectively. In a final discussion, possible ways of transmission for the donkey from the Iranian plateau to the Chinese heartland are evaluated with regard to the cultural, linguistic, and topographic conditions reflected in the previous parts.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Eurasian Linguistics
Free access
In: International Journal of Eurasian Linguistics