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In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
Editor / Translator:
In: A Confucian Autobiography of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong
The Experiences of International and Domestic Students Studying in an Australian University
Volume Editor:
Eight international and four domestic doctoral students share the story of completing their doctoral journey at an Australian university, as well as their experiences of being part of a large collaborative research group that served as a source of support and motivation on their doctoral journey. They share their dreams, hopes, and frustrations of searching, applying, being rejected and finally accepted as a doctoral candidate. International students share their impressions and experiences of being in a new land with a new language and immersing themselves and their families in a distinctly different culture and society. These are the stories of the challenges they encountered and their struggles and successes.

Contributors are: Elizabeth Allotta, Laura Emily Clark, Maria Ejlertsen, Daeul Jeong, Solange Lima, Huifang Liu, Mohammad Tareque Rahman, Umme Salma, Margaret Schuls, Sara Haghighi Siahgorabi, Lauren Thomasse and Tran Le Nghi Tran.
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In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

Abstract

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, artists could not perform live at music venues, and online performance on social media platforms has become an ordinary event. This transition from the physical stage to virtual platforms benefited many artists and audiences. However, it has also raised some questions about the music industry and its impacts on musicians. Through an autoethnographic analysis of my experience as an independent Filipino musician delivering livestreamed performances during the pandemic, this paper analyzes the constraints – personal, technological, and performative – on musicians in doing online gigs on social media. I also show the relationship between these constraints and the larger issues of inequality and vulnerability among musicians. The discussion is reflexive, as it presents the sociological underpinnings of online gigs by amateur and independent musicians. The paper also describes opportunities and inequalities created by online livestreaming, especially during the pandemic.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia
Author:

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of Facebook by cultural professionals in Vietnam to maintain connections with their audiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. Facebook provided a simple and free way of maintaining connections with audiences at a time of increased pressure to shift and adapt to online work immediately. However, concerns have emerged about the nature of arts-centred endeavours that are at odds with this for-profit platform and the production of digital culture in the Global South via a Western platform. The investigation uses findings from 50 semi-structured interviews with cultural professionals and a digital ethnography of seven art organizations’ Facebook posts over two months. It highlights that the Covid-19 pandemic propelled a paradigm shift in how cultural professionals communicated with their audiences via Facebook. These shifts have longer and broader implications for the future of work in the cultural sector, both in Asia and globally.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia

Abstract

This paper draws on findings from a systemic review of work published globally on museums’ responses to the Covid-19 pandemic and recommendations for future development in the museum sector. This can be used to determine the best practices for museums, including how to create engaging digital content, boost cultural tourism using digital technologies, create new business models, and manage copyright and legal protection of digitized content. It can be used to inform museums across Vietnam and beyond about the best practices internationally for Covid recovery by showing what published studies globally state about future practices to ensure the sustainability of museums. It also outlines an ethics of digitization concerning access to digital technologies and general understandings of the ‘correct’ use of digital content. This can be used as a ‘roadmap’ for museum professionals and fills a needs gap in Vietnam on digital culture policy, digital skills, and knowledge on how to manage legal and copyright issues with digital content. Overall, this paper can assist the national museum sector navigate a digital transition.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia