Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19,444 items for :

  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions
Series Editor:
The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.

East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
This is a peer-reviewed book series that seeks to understand the process of European expansion, interchange and connectivity in a global context in the early modern and modern period. It will seek to understand this transformative process and period in cultural, economic, social, and ideological terms in Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central and East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This series will provide a forum for varied scholarly work - original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations - on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period from the Portuguese navigators of the late fifteenth century until the end of ‘Company’ rule in British India in the mid-nineteenth century. It will move beyond the traditional isolated and nation bound historiographical emphases of this field which have isolated continents and nation-states and toward a broader intellectual terrain, encouraging whenever possible non-European perspectives. It will also encourage a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes in this series will include the exchange of ideas and products, especially through the medium of trading companies; the exchange of religions and traditions; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy, as well as identity formation. It will seek out studies that employ diverse forms of analysis from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies. In addition, it will include works translated from French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor George Bryan Souza or the Publisher at Brill Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
The European Association for American Studies Series
Series Editor:
European Perspectives on the United States: The European Association for American Studies Series is published under the auspices and with the editorial involvement of the European Association for American Studies. This peer-reviewed series provides a broad reflection of the state of American Studies in Europe. While the series prioritizes academic works that accentuate the importance of transnationality and interdisciplinarity in the study of the United States, it aims to properly recognize the diverse and relevant European achievements in the main disciplines of American Studies, to include but not limited to literary studies, cultural studies, film and media studies, history, and the social sciences. Benefiting from the varied professional alignments of European Americanists, European Perspectives on the United States will initiate new directions of dialogue in American Studies by opening the field to voices from across nations and continents.

European Perspectives on the United States has value for a wide and diverse range of academics and postdoctoral and postgraduate research students representing an array of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. The series is intended to serve as an inclusive resource for researchers and readers with a multi-/interdisciplinary focus in American Studies. Given the central importance of American Studies in relation to key questions of global import relating to climate, migration, borders, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, terrorism, and many other topics, the series serves as a much-needed forum to foster dialogue and cooperation within and between spheres of inquiry and activity.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
While the social history of Europe and North America has been the subject of many scholarly publications, the social history of Asia, Africa, and Latin America has been more neglected. Furthermore, these societies are often studied in isolation from the global context. The series Studies in the Social History of the Global South offers a platform for the social history of these three continents with the specific intention of redressing the balance in terms of the perceived dominance of studies on the global north. This series welcomes publications of case studies at the local, regional and continental level. Studies in Social History of the Global South, as a sub-series of Studies in Global Social History, shares the aims and scope of the main series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals or full manuscripts to the series editors Touraj Atabaki, Rossana Barragán, and Stefano Bellucci, or to the publisher at Brill, Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Author:

Abstract

The writing of Pope Innocent III (r. 1198–1216) contains multiple references to the irascible power of the human soul, the purpose of which was to repel evil. In Si dormiatis, Innocent’s sermon on the ideal priesthood, the violent emotional behaviour produced by the irascible power is proof that the priest was carrying out his office correctly. Analysis of the sermon in the context of Innocent’s own corpus, contemporary commentaries on ‘angry emotions’, and the intense period of ecclesiastical reform in which Innocent was writing reveals that Innocent intended this aggressive response to instantiate correct order, shore up clerical and papal authority over the spiritual, and protect this authority as the exclusive preserve of men.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
The series Architecture – Technology – Culture provides a publishing environment for cutting-edge research in the three areas where modern technology effected major and lasting changes: architecture and space, visual culture and the media, literature and the arts in general. While our prime focus is on the theory, history, and politics of technology, both architecture and, the broader, accompanying field of culture are in many ways directly related to and influenced by technological changes. Thus one can look at architecture as a technology of spatial organization, a technical system of signs or, in Nobert Wiener's terms, a "technique" of the time that reflects the aesthetic and intellectual order of a given society. Literature and the arts, on the other hand, are crucial in negotiating the tensions that arise from the introduction of new technologies, of new means of production and communication. By making technological progress palatable for a larger public or by questioning its safety and its potential negative consequences for the future, the arts are inextricably involved in the changing of physical space and the environment in modern society and their styles and structures are often formed as a response to larger networks such as urban space, transportation or the changes in visual and material culture.