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Text and Context in Ancient Egypt. Studies in Honor of James P. Allen
In the House of Heqanakht: Text and Context in Ancient Egypt gathers Egyptological articles in honor of James P. Allen, Charles Edwin Wilbour Professor of Egyptology at Brown University. Professor Allen's contribution to our current understanding of the ancient Egyptian language, religion, society, and history is immeasurable and has earned him the respect of generations of scholars. In accordance with Professor Allen’s own academic prolificity, the present volume represents an assemblage of studies that range among different methodologies, objects of study, and time periods. The contributors specifically focus on the interconnectedness of text and context in ancient Egypt, exploring how a symbiosis of linguistics, philology, archaeology, and history can help us reconstruct a more accurate picture of ancient Egypt and its people.
Author: Serdar Yalcin
Typically carved in stone, the cylinder seal is perhaps the most distinctive art form to emerge in ancient Mesopotamia. It spread across the Near East from ca. 3300 BCE onwards, and remained in use for millennia. What was the role of this intricate object in the making of a person's social identity? As the first comprehensive study dedicated to this question, Selves Engraved on Stone explores the ways in which different but often intersecting aspects of identity, such as religion, gender, community and profession, were constructed through the material, visual, and textual characteristics of seals from Mesopotamia and Syria.
from the Middle Bronze Age to the Crusader Period
Volume Editors: Michal Artzy and Aaron Brody
In this volume, Aaron Brody and Michal Artzy offer the first in-depth analysis from excavations at Tel Akko. The most prominent harbor city on the northern coast of the southern Levant, the city was a nexus between the sea routes of the eastern Mediterranean and the overland networks of its hinterland.

Stratigraphy, architecture, and material culture from the site’s Area H are presented, along with studies by Jennie Ebeling, Jeffrey Rose, and Edward Maher on stone artifacts and animal bones from burials. The volume presents Middle Bronze IIA rampart materials and MB IIB-IIC burials; transitional end of Late Bronze-beginning of Iron I finds; and southern Phoenician ceramics.

The Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Harvard Semitic Studies and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
Volume Editors: Mark Hebblewhite and Conor Whately
Brill’s Companion to Bodyguards in the Ancient Mediterranean is the first scholarly volume solely dedicated to understanding bodyguards of the ancient Mediterranean world. From the Pharaohs of Egypt through to the emperors of the Early Byzantine Empire, this volume not only identifies who served as bodyguards for rulers and other political powerbrokers, but also details the symbolic role bodyguards played in the maintenance of power. The volume also highlights the political, religious, and social significance of bodyguards to individual regimes, and the important role bodyguards played in the projection of power and legitimacy to key interest groups within a particular society.
A Memorial in the World offers a new appraisal of the reception and role of Constantine the Great and Ardashir I (the founder of the Sasanian Empire c.224-651), in their respective cultural spheres. Concentrating on marked parallels in the legendary material attached to both men it argues that the memories of both were reshaped by processes referencing the same deep literary heritage.

What is more, as “founders” of imperial systems that identified with a particular religious community, the literature that developed around these late antique figures applied these ancient tropes in a startlingly parallel direction. This parallel offers a new angle on the Kārnāmag tradition, an originally Middle Persian biographical tradition of Ardashir I.
Through new readings and interpretation of Cypriot inscriptions – written in Cypriot-syllabic Greek, Eteocypriot, Phoenician, and alphabetic Greek – Kypriōn Politeia, the Political and Administrative Systems of the Classical Cypriot City-Kingdoms is the first book which reconstructs in detail the political and administrative systems of the Classical city-kingdoms of Cyprus. The book investigates the bodies of government beyond the Cypriot kings and the roles played by magistrates and officials in local governments, it analyses accounts of the headquarters of the main administrative and economic activities – such as palace archives, and tax collection hubs –, and demonstrates that these systems were similar in all the city-kingdoms.
Volume Editors: F.A.J. Hoogendijk and Joanne Vera Stolk
This volume contains the first edition of 66 papyri and ostraca in the collection of the Leiden Papyrological Institute. The texts are dated between the third century BCE and the eighth century CE and originate from Egypt. They include two Demotic literary papyri (one of which is written in Hieratic script), 19 Demotic ostraca, 44 Greek documentary papyri and one Coptic ostracon. All texts are published with transcription, translation, commentary and colour photographs.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is a two-volume set.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 1.
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 2.
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.