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Author: Rochelle Ziskin
In Private Salons and the Art World of Enlightenment Paris, Rochelle Ziskin explores in depth two remarkable private gatherings generating significant art criticism during the middle of the eighteenth century. She demonstrates how the sites harboring them came to embody and disseminate their judgments. One politically active group assembled at the house Mme Doublet shared with amateur Petit de Bachaumont; at her “Mondays” for artists, Mme Geoffrin collaborated with the powerful lover of antiquity Caylus and amateurs including Mariette and Watelet. In focusing on official Salons of the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, historians too often overlook the crucial role of these frequent, regular assemblies. There works of art were quite often first assessed and taste shaped.
Judging Old Masters at Agnew’s and the National Gallery, c.1874-1916
Author: Alison Clarke
In Spaces of Connoisseurship, Alison Clarke explores the ‘who’, ‘where’ and ‘how’ of judging Old Master paintings in the nineteenth-century British art trade. She describes how the staff at family art dealers Thomas Agnew & Sons (“Agnew’s”) and London’s National Gallery took advantage of emerging technologies such as the railways and photography. Through encounters with pictures in a range of locations, both private and public, these art market actors could build up the visual memory and necessary expertise to compare artworks and judge them in terms of attribution, condition and beauty. Also explored are the display tactics adopted by both commercial outfit and art museum to showcase pictures once acquired. In a time of ever-spiralling art prices, this book tackles the question of why some paintings are preferred over others, and exactly how art experts reach their judgements.
Collecting, Patronage and the Art Market in Italy, 1450-1650
Volume Editor: Inge Reist
Through case studies of collectors, patrons, and agents who redefined collecting and the art market, this volume illuminates how the changing status of the artist, rise of connoisseurship, role of intermediaries and new patterns of consumption established models for collecting and display that resemble those still practiced today. The book presents new research by recognized scholars who examine the motivations of collectors and agents, emphasizing how their collecting, patronage and advocacy could require support of artists whose reputations were not fully established. Together, the essays invite consideration of works that are familiar in art-historical terms but less so as markers of the socio-economic shifts of a particular cultural moment.

This book evolved from a symposium “When Michelangelo was Modern: The Art Market and Collecting in Italy, 1450–1650,” organized by the Center for the History of Collecting, that was held at The Frick Collection on April 12 and 13, 2019. Both the book and the symposium were made possible through the generous support of the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

The book is published in association with The Frick Collection.
In: When Michelangelo Was Modern
In: When Michelangelo Was Modern