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Editors: Andrew Hall and Leighanne Yuh
Education, the production of knowledge, identity formation, and ideological hegemony are inextricably linked in early modern and modern Korea. This study examines the production and consumption of knowledge by a multitude of actors and across languages, texts, and disciplines to analyze the formulation, contestation, and negotiation of knowledge. The production and dissemination of knowledge become sites for contestation and struggle—sometimes overlapping, at other times competing—resulting in a shift from a focus on state power and its control over knowledge and discourse to an analysis of local processes of knowledge production and the roles local actors play in them. Contributors are Daniel Pieper, W. Scott Wells, Yong-Jin Hahn, Furukawa Noriko, Lim Sang Seok, Kokubu Mari, Mark Caprio, Deborah Solomon, and Yoonmi Lee.
Dissent and Creativity in Chosŏn Korea
The Lives and Legacy of Kim Sisŭp (1435–1493) offers an account of the most extraordinary figure of Korean literature and intellectual history. The present work narrates the fascinating story of a prodigious child, acclaimed poet, author of the first Korean novel, Buddhist monk, model subject, Confucian recluse and Daoist master. No other Chosŏn scholar or writer has been venerated in both Confucian shrines and Buddhist temples, had his works widely read in Tokugawa Japan and became an integral part of the North Korean literary canon.
The nine studies and further materials presented in this volume provide a detailed look on the various aspects of Kim Sisŭp’s life and work as well as a reflection of both traditional and modern narratives surrounding his legacy. Contributors are: Vladimír Glomb, Gregory N. Evon, Dennis Wuerthner, Barbara Wall, Kim Daeyeol, Miriam Löwensteinová, Anastasia A. Guryeva, Sixiang Wang, and Diana Yüksel.
This annual series provides up-to-date information on the politics, economy and society of both South and North Korea.
Each volume is structured as follows: The first part offers the reader an up-to-date analysis and commentary on the following topics:
"Domestic Politics and the Economy in South Korea",
"Domestic Politics and the Economy in North Korea",
"Relations between the two Koreas", and
"Foreign Relations of the two Koreas".
A detailed chronology of relevant events in the year preceding publication complements this first part.
The second part consists of some eight to ten refereed, original articles with contributions on contemporary Korean affairs in fields such as politics, economy and society.
For regular and professional observers of Korea in business, politics, the media and academia, this book series is an indispensable resource both for keeping track of developments, and for gathering new insights.

More details on the Korea: Politics, Economy and Society series can be found at wirtschaft.ostasien.univie.ac.at/index.php?id=34449.

This series publishes work on the history of monies, markets and finance in East Asia, mainly during the period from 1600 to 1900 and with a regional focus on China, Japan and Korea. Monies not only refer to physical objects and monetary functions, but also to such related aspects as mining, smelting and transportation of monetary metals. The multiplicity of markets implies the existence of different currency circuits and competing currencies. The topic of finance includes case studies both on public dimensions and private institutions. Contributions in this series not only deal with empirical and theoretical approaches to economic, social and political aspects, but also with cultural characteristics and meanings. By establishing a solid basis in these domains, the series aims at serving as a starting point for solid cross-cultural comparative research.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
In Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison, the chapters offer a reflection on the state of the field of Taiwan and Korea Studies. For the editors, the volume’s purpose was to identify not just their similarities, but also a reflection on their differences. Both have national identities formed in a colonial period. The surrender of Japan in 1945 ignited the light of independence for Korea, but this would be ideologically split within five years. For Taiwan, that end forced it into a born-again form of nationalism with the arrival of the Chinese Nationalists.

Taiwan and South Korea’s economic development illustrate a progressive transition and key to understanding this is the relationship between ‘modernization’ and ‘democracy’. By looking at Korea and Taiwan, the chapters in the volume broaden an understanding of the interconnectivity of the region.
Authors: Dafydd Fell and Sojin Lim

Abstract

This chapter compares two area studies teaching programs: Taiwan Studies at SOAS, University of London; and Korean Studies at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan). In both cases, humanities, linguistics and social sciences have been well integrated into their programs. The SOAS Taiwan program has largely had a social sciences and humanities focus, with languages receiving less attention. In contrast, the UCLan Korean program began with language components and later expanded to include social sciences modules. The SOAS Taiwan Studies program initially concentrated on postgraduate teaching before, but later on it began to offer more undergraduate classes. The UCLan Korean Studies program has the largest BA program in the UK, and began to offer its MA program in North Korean Studies recently. The SOAS Taiwan Studies program has operated for over two decades in the UK already, while UCLan Korean Studies began about seven years ago. Both teaching programs are well integrated with their research center and institute - the Centre of Taiwan Studies at SOAS and the International Institute of Korean Studies at UCLan. This chapter also discusses some challenges they face, such as securing external funding and scholarship opportunities. In order to achieve enhanced teaching and research environments for both students and academics, both universities will need to develop strong engagement with relevant funders and innovative strategies.

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In: Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison
In: Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison
Author: Michael J. Seth

Abstract

The years of Japanese colonial rule, 1910–1945, saw the emergence of a powerful popular Korean nationalism. This sense of national identity both competed with and was shaped by other transnational identities: with the Japanese Empire, with East Asia, with the “civilized and enlightened” global order centered in the West, and with the international proletariat movement. These various forms of identities were part of a colonial cosmopolitanism that characterized the new urban middle class and the intellectuals of this period. The various trans-national identities often contested with each and contributed to the ideological divisions that emerged in the nationalist movement and had a major impact on the development of Korea after liberation in 1945. This article looks at the various ways Koreans in the colonial period identified with communities beyond Korea.

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In: Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison
Author: Young-Im Lee

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the first female presidents of South Korea and Taiwan, Park Geun-hye and Tsai Ing-wen, focusing on each one’s biographical background, term as party chairperson, presidential bid, and election results. While acknowledging that candidates’ gender is not the most decisive factor for the voters, this analysis shows that gender was relevant to how each woman received her party’s nomination and framed her campaign. Neither Park nor Tsai identifies herself as a feminist even though they were both trailblazers in the male-dominated field of politics. Both candidates still used the “positive” gender stereotypes about women to curry support when their parties were suffering from declining popularity. For better or worse, the fact that they were women opened up a window of opportunity for them to rise through the ranks in their party when there seemed to be no viable alternatives. They earned credibility and legitimacy by successfully turning things around as their respective party’s chair. The fact that both were subject to misogynistic comments and that their campaigns even attempted to use the “first woman” frame to appeal to voters shows that their gender was not invisible.

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In: Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison

Abstract

Dramatic geopolitical developments such as the Chinese Civil War, World War II, and The Korean War, along with the status inside of the United Nations (UN) created the grounds for the diplomatic position of Taiwan and South Korea in Twentieth century global politics that persists unto the present. Years later, economic development and democratization would also be important factors in the elaboration of these countries’ foreign policies, as well as the maintenance or expansion of their international space, and their responses to the challenges posed by their powerful neighbors who claim those territories. This chapter discusses some elements that played essential roles, first from 1949 until 1971 when both Koreans and Taiwanese were fighting for their place inside the UN, and later from 1972 to the present, when the Sino-American rapprochement changed the balance of power in the region.

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In: Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison