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Selected Works of Li Bingde, Lu Jie, Wang Fengxian and Huang Ji
Editors: Ruth Hayhoe, Jun Li, and Julia Pan
This book introduces four influential Chinese educators of the later 20th century whose writings had enormous influence on many dimensions of the educational reforms which underly China’s remarkable transformation into a global superpower. None of them published in English and only Li Bingde, a leader in educational experimentation, had studied abroad. Huang Ji at Beijing Normal University was an educational philosopher who interpreted Chinese classical texts as well as arts such as calligraphy and painting in ways that brought new life to Chinese pedagogy. Lu Jie at Nanjing Normal University and Wang Fengxian at Northeast Normal University were leaders in developing a whole new approach to moral education that highlighted subjectivity and self awakening as China became a socialist market economy.
Author: Tsung-i Jao
Editor / Translator: Joern Peter Grundmann
Author: Tsung-i Jao
Editor / Translator: Colin Huehns
From prehistoric bone flutes to Confucian bell-sets, from ancient divination to his beloved qin, this book presents translations of thirteen seminal essays on musical subjects by Jao Tsung-i. In language as elegant and refined as the ancient texts he so admired, his journey takes readers through Buddhist incantation, the philosophy of musical instruments, acoustical numerology, lyric poetry, historical and sociological contexts, manuscript studies, dance choreography, repertoire formulation, and opera texts. His voice is authoritative and intimate, the expert crafting his arguments, both accessible and sophisticated, succinct and richly tapestried; and concealed within a deft modesty is a thinker privileging us with his most profound observation. The musician’s musician, the scholar’s scholar, bold yet cautious, flamboyant yet restrained, a man for all seasons, a harmoniousness of time and place.
Author: Ofer Peres

Abstract

The Ñāna-vāciṭṭam is an unstudied seventeenth-century Tamil translation of the Laghu-yoga-vāsiṣṭha, itself an abridged version of the Sanskrit masterpiece Mokṣopāya. This article is a preliminary study of the translation strategies of the Ñāna-vāciṭṭam. I focus on one narrative section from the Ñāna-vāciṭṭam and its relation to the Sanskrit source, and demonstrate that the translator introduces subtle deviations that add to it an ironic tone by which an additional, meta-poetic level of philosophical meaning is produced. I further suggest that the style of this translation is influenced by the prabandha literary genre that emerged in early modern South India.

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History

Abstract

Among the works of the eighteenth-century Telugu poet, Kūcimañci Jaggakavi, we find the unusual būtu-kāvya—a self-declared obscene work—called Candrarekhā’s Lament, Candrarekhā-vilāpamu. It tells the story of a far-from-beautiful village courtesan and her eager lover, Cintalapāṭi Nīlādrirāju, a small-scale king and connoisseur of sexually available women. The text, written partly to take revenge on this king for reneging on his promise to patronize the poet, simultaneously preserves and flouts the literary conventions of the Telugu prabandha. The surprising ending reveals a new aesthetic orientation in Telugu, one in which extreme parody exceeds its own natural limits and generates a range of innovative means. Thus a hyper-realistic narrative of erotic desire as it evolves toward ordinary, or extraordinary, human love is suddenly a good topic for a prabandha.

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
Author: David Shulman

Abstract

In all the literatures of South Indian, in the four major vernaculars as well as in Sanskrit and Persian, a new compositional form—more a creative mode than a genre—makes its appearance in the early-modern period, beginning in the late fifteenth century. Terms vary—the Telugu tradition speaks of prabandhas or mahāprabandhas, and this essay adopts the name—but the shared features are everywhere in the south: relatively compact, thematically unified compositions, meant to be read sequentially from beginning to end, with an author who takes responsibility for the work and a new economy of sound in relation to meaning. We explore issues of texture, intertexture, tonality, self-reference, irony, and distinctive voicing across the languages and cultural milieux, and we seek to reconstruct, inductively, something of the lost protocols of reading that shaped the emergence of these texts.

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
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In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
Author: Jennifer Clare

Abstract

This article looks at early modern literary genres in Tamil to better understand the relationship between Tamil literature and other South Indian prabandha traditions. What this article shows is that between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, new ways of thinking about innovation and authorship entered Tamil literature, new modes that shared key features with the larger South Indian category of prabandha, despite the divergent history of the term prabandha itself in Tamil. These new modes, which emerged in a range of literary genres in which the term prabandha (Tam. pirapantam) is notably absent, introduced the poet as a human subject whose complex personal relationships—both to people as well as to other texts—were inseparable from the story of the text’s creation. This privileging of the lived experience of individual poets became a marker of a new type of multi-stanzaic narrative verse, distinguished both from its antecedents as well as from other contemporary genres that retained older models of literary innovation. By thinking about new models of authorship and innovation as features shared across early modern literary genres in South India, this article enters into conversation with the other articles in this volume and reveals a shared intellectual and cultural history with the larger South Indian prabandha tradition.

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
Authors: Talia Ariav and Whitney Cox

Abstract

This article presents an interpretation of the Śṛṅgāratilakabhāṇa of Rāmabhadradīkṣita, a poet active in the vicinity of Thanjavur at the turn of the eighteenth century. The bhāṇa is an erotic-comic monologue, which in Rāmabhadra’s hands is used, in our reading, to ironic and self-subverting ends. While the play concludes with the sort of happy ending conventional to its genre, it contains potent unresolved tensions, which we understand as deliberate elements of Rāmabhadra’s authorial project. At the center of our interpretation are questions about the representation of sexual consent and coercion, and the ways in which the monological techniques of the genre make possible Rāmabhadra’s innovative explorations of time, perspective, and self-reflexivity.

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
Translator: John Hocking
Hiromatsu argues that the change from Marx's theory of self-alienation to the concept of reification is crucial in establishing a new relational worldview which is still relevant today. Amongst other topics, his discussion of the understanding of society sees such as a relational dynamic wherein the individual is constantly composed and composing in relation to others, including nature. This understanding is, he argues, the “single science of history” of Marx and Engels. It overcomes the hypostasizing subject - object relation still prevalent today.

Originally published in Japanese as Busshōkaron no kōzu by Iwanami Shoten, Publishers, Tokyo, 1983, 1994. © By Kuniko Hiromatsu.