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A Study in Hymnody, Hero Cult, and Homeric Reception
Author:
Apollonius represents a crucial link in the epic tradition spanning Homer and Vergil, but arrestingly, his epic Argonautica rather begins and ends in the style of a Homeric Hymn. This book contends that Apollonius thus frames his poem as an innovative synthesis of both branches of his Homeric inheritance: an “epic hymn” that simultaneously commemorates its protagonists’ glorious deeds and venerates them in their religious capacity as divinized cult heroes. This study—the first-ever in-depth investigation of Apollonius’ profound engagement with the hymnic Homer—promises to reorient scholarly understandings of the Argonautica’s novel narrative strategies, its inclusive conception of heroism, and indeed, its very generic affiliations.
Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World
Elements, Nature, Environment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from the Ancient to the Early Modern World publishes high-quality scholarship that explores the relationship between the elements and the environment, covering the periods from antiquity to early modern. The series encourages cutting-edge research with a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches in the fields of including (but not limited to) history of science, philosophy, linguistics, literature, history, art history, and eco-criticism, ranging from Northern Europe and the Mediterranean world to Africa and the Middle East, India, Japan, China, and other regions.

Contributions may cover the areas of history of the elements and elemental theory; environment, cosmology, and climate; well-being and the human body alongside food, nutrition, diets, herbs as well as its relevance for pharmacology and medicine; disasters and epidemics; animal lore, agriculture, and landscapes; maps and diagrams; weather, meteorology, and religion. These and other related themes could be explored either diachronically or by focusing on any specific time period between antiquity and early modern. The series promotes collaborative and comparative analysis of textual or visual sources from different traditions and historical periods, and maps points of intersection alongside differences in the way in which various civilisations understood their place within nature and the environment around them. Inter-, multi-, and cross-disciplinary approaches are particularly welcomed.

The series operates with a variety of formats, from monographs and edited thematic collections to critical editions and translations into English.
Aiming to provide the ultimate guide to Byzantine scholarship, this series publishes review monographs with commentary on the current state of the field in Byzantine studies. The series promotes a broad vision of Byzantium, defining it as the society that evolved following Constantine I’s conversion to Christianity and construction of Constantinople as a new capital for the Eastern Roman Empire in the fourth century.

Topics covered include well-established areas of research as well as emergent fields, challenging past historiographical approaches and suggesting new directions for future investigation. Books draw on the latest inter- and multi-disciplinary research in art history and archaeology, culture and society, history, literature, religious studies, and more, to provide critical and accessible analyses suitable for scholars, teachers, and students alike.

If you are interested in writing a Research Perspective, or would like to know more, please get in touch with either the Editor-in-Chief, Dr Mike Humphreys or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Classical Studies E-Books Onlineis the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Classical Studies.

Coverage:
Ancient Philosophy, Ancient History, Ancient Religion, Greek and Roman Literature, Epigraphy & Papyrology, Archeology

This e-book collection is part of Brill's Humanities and Social Sciences E-Book collection.

The list of titles per collection can be found here.

Abstract

Alexander of Aphrodisias reports a series of arguments from Aristotle’s Περὶ τἀγαθοῦ purportedly deployed by Plato to defend his doctrine of principles. One of these arguments, the so-called “categorial reduction argument”, underpins the postulation of the two first principles, the One and the Great and Small, through a bipartition of all beings into two categories, labeled ‘in themselves’ and ‘opposites’. I scrutinize this argument and compare it with other Early Academic bicategorial divisions and especially with the tripartite categorial distinction, itself apparently based on material of Early Academic provenance, included in Sextus Empiricus’ Adversus Physicos 2.262-275. I argue that the Περὶ τἀγαθοῦ account of the “categorial reduction argument” leaves open certain philosophical problems, and Sextus’ report is best interpreted, rather than as a more detailed version of that account (as a common view would have it), as an alternative formulation of it that incorporates a philosophical attempt to disentangle those problems.

In: Mnemosyne
In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

The author uses the literary and material record to explicate the manual labour described in Plautus, Casina 121-125. The original Greek (it is argued) featured a simpler task, evocative of the myth of the Danaids.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

Building on previous studies, this essay discusses the use of embryological images and analogies in Anaximander, Empedocles, Democritus, and Lucretius. It pursues their intertextual connections arguing that in ancient philosophy embryology was not only relevant for conceiving the early formation of the cosmos as has been claimed so far, but that it also shaped the conception of the primeval rise of animal life and the living processes of plants.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

This essay critically examines Peter Sloterdijk’s Zorn und Zeit. Politisch-psychologischer Versuch (Rage and Time. A Psychopolitical Investigation) and his attempt to rehabilitate a culture of thymos, i.e. a culture of self-confidence and self-assertion, whose emotional agent Sloterdijk sees in rage. As an alternative to Achilles’ rage in Homer’s Iliad, Sloterdijk’s ancient reference, I will propose Ovid’s Metamorphoses as another literary origin of thymos. Against this background, I aim to defend the legitimacy of thymos, but to give it a different profile than Sloterdijk does, namely that of a creative and culturally productive energy that dismantles the tradition of warlike heroism and is pacifist at its core.

In: Mnemosyne