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Volume Editors: Michael Hanaghan and David Woods
Ammianus Marcellinus composed a history of the Roman empire from 96 AD to 378 AD, focusing on the mid-fourth century during which he served in the army. His experience as a soldier during this period provides crucial realia of warfare, while his knowledge of literature, especially the genre of historiography, enabled him to imbue his narrative with literary flair. This book explores the tension between Ammianus’ roles as soldier and author, examining how his military experience affected his history, and conversely how his knowledge of literature affected his descriptions of the Roman army.
This Companion is the first of its kind on the Roman historian Cassius Dio. It introduces the reader to the life and work of one of the most fundamental but previously neglected historians in the Roman historical cannon. Together the eighteen chapters focus on Cassius Dio’s background as Graeco-Roman intellectual from Bithynia who worked his way up the political hierarchy in Rome and analyses his Roman History as the product of a politically engaged historian who carefully ties Rome’s constitutional situation together with the city’s history.
Volume Editors: Hannah Cornwell and Greg Woolf
For more than fifty years the standard debates about Roman Imperialism were written more or less entirely in terms of male agency, male competition, and male participation. Not only have women been marginalized in these narratives as just so much collateral damage but there has been little engagement with gender history more widely, with the linkages between masculinity and warfare, with the representation of relations of power in terms of gender differentials, with the ways social reproduction entangled the production of gender and the production of empire. This volume explores how we might gender Roman Imperialism.
Volume Editors: Koenraad Verboven and Paul Erdkamp
This book offers critical analyses of the dynamic relation between legal regulations, institutions and economic performance in the Roman world. It studies how law and legal thought affected economic development, and vice versa. Inspired by New Institutional Economics scholars the past decades used ancient law to explain economic growth. There was, however, no natural selection process directing legal changes towards macro-economic efficiency. Ancient rulers and jurists modified institutions to serve or safeguard particular interests—political, social, or economic. Nevertheless both economic performance and legal scholarship peaked at unprecedented levels. These were momentous historical developments. How were they related?
In: Corpus des papyrus grecs sur les relations administratives entre le clergé égyptien et les autorités romaines
In: Corpus des papyrus grecs sur les relations administratives entre le clergé égyptien et les autorités romaines
In: Corpus des papyrus grecs sur les relations administratives entre le clergé égyptien et les autorités romaines
In: Corpus des papyrus grecs sur les relations administratives entre le clergé égyptien et les autorités romaines
In: Corpus des papyrus grecs sur les relations administratives entre le clergé égyptien et les autorités romaines