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Ptolomeus et multi sapientum (Abraham Ibn Ezra Latinus) — Robert of Chester, Liber canonum, pt. II
This volume makes available two little-known twelfth-century Latin sources on mathematical astronomy: the anonymous Ptolomeus et multi sapientum… (c.1145), which is attributable to the famous Jewish astrologer Abraham Ibn Ezra, and the surviving second part of Robert of Chester’s Liber canonum, which accompanied the Tables of London (c.1150). Both texts are introductory-level works originally written to educate a Latin Christian audience in the concepts and techniques involved in computing with astronomical tables. They are here presented in critical editions with facing English translations. The accompanying introductions and in-depth commentaries elucidate their significance in the context of twelfth-century Latin astronomy.
This is a ground-breaking philosophical-historical study of the work of Galen of Pergamum. It contains four case-studies on (1) Galen’s remarkable and original thoughts on the relation between body and soul, (2) his notion of human nature, (3) his engagement with Plato’s Timaeus, (4) and black bile and melancholy. It shows that Galen develops an innovative view of human nature that problematizes the distinction between body and soul.
Documents from Antiquity to the 16th Century in the Historical West (Bactria to the Atlantic)
Editor: Dimitri Gutas
From antiquity to the 16th century, translation united culturally the peoples in the historical West (from Bactria to the shores of the Atlantic) and fueled the production and circulation of knowledge. The Hellenic scientific and philosophical curriculum was translated from and into, to mention the most prevalent languages, Greek, Syriac, Middle Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin.
To fill a lack in existing scholarship, this volume collects the documents that present the insider evidence provided in contemporary accounts of the motivations and purposes of translation given in the personal statements by the agents in this process, the translators, scholars, and historians of each society. Presented in the original languages with an English translation and introductory essays, these documents offer material for the study of the historical contextualization of the translations, the social history of science and philosophy in their interplay with traditional beliefs, and the cultural policies and ideological underpinnings of these societies.

Contributors
Michael Angold, Pieter Beullens, Charles Burnett, David Cohen, Gad Freudenthal, Dag Nikolaus Hasse, Anthony Kaldellis, Daniel King, Felix Mundt, Ignacio Sánchez, Isabel Toral, Uwe Vagelpohl, and Mohsen Zakeri.
In: Why Translate Science?
In: Why Translate Science?
In: Why Translate Science?
In: Why Translate Science?
In: Why Translate Science?
In: Why Translate Science?