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In a modernist interpretation of migration controls, nation states play a major role. This book challenges this interpretation by showing that comprehensive migration checks and permanent border controls appeared much earlier, in early modern dynastic states and empires, and predated nation states by centuries.

The 11 contributions in this volume explore the role of early modern and modern dynastic kingdoms and empires in Europe, the Middle East and Eurasia and the evolution of border controls from the 16th to the 20th century. They analyse how these states interacted with other polities, such as emerging nations states in Europe, North America and Australia, and what this means for a broader reconceptualization of mobility in Europe and beyond in the longue durée.

Contributors are: Tobias Brinkmann, Vincent Denis, Sinan Dinçer, Josef Ehmer, Irial A. Glynn, Sabine Jesner, Olga Katsiardi-Hering, Leo Lucassen, Ikaros Mantouvalos, Leslie Page Moch, Jovan Pešalj, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Annemarie Steidl, and Megan Williams.
Free Soil and Fugitive Slaves from the U.S. South to Mexico’s Northeast, 1803–1861
Author: Thomas Mareite
While the literature on slave flight in nineteenth-century North America has commonly focused on fugitive slaves escaping to the U.S. North and Canada, Conditional Freedom provides new insights on the social and political geography of freedom and slavery in nineteenth-century North America by exploring the development of southern routes of escape from slavery in the U.S. South and the experiences of self-emancipated slaves in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands. In Conditional Freedom, Thomas Mareite offers a social history of U.S. refugees from slavery, and provides a political history of the clash between Mexican free soil and the spread of slavery west of the Mississippi valley during the nineteenth-century.
Author: Adam Marks
The Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) was a significant and traumatic event in the history of Europe. Based upon original archival research conducted across European archives, this book discusses both the successes and failures of the early Stuarts’ foreign policy.
It sheds new light on the Spanish match, reassesses the military capacity of the Stuart state in the run up to the Civil War and fundamentally challenges the idea that there was little or no engagement by England with the Thirty Years’ War.
A Comparative Study of Four National Literary Traditions
Author: Jean Kommers
This literary analysis of the representation of ‘Gypsies’ in juvenile literature is unique in its comparative scope, as well as in the special attention to rare pre-1850 narratives, the period in which juvenile literature developed as a specific genre. Most studies on the subject are about one national literary tradition or confined to a limited period. In this study Dutch, English, French and German texts are analysed and discussed with reference to main academic publications on the subject. Emphasis is on the rich variation in narrative presentations, rather than on an inventory of images or prejudices. An important topic is the fundamental difference between early English and German narratives. Important because of the wide dissemination of German stories.
Author: Tom Brass
The focus of this volume is on political discourse about the pattern and desirability of economic development, and how/why historical interpretations of social phenomena connected to this systemic process alter. It is a trajectory pursued here with reference to the materialism of Marxism, via the mid-nineteenth century ideas about race, through the development decade, the ‘cultural turn’, debates about modes of production and their respective labour regimes, culminating in the role played by immigration before and after the Brexit referendum. Also examined is the trajectory followed by travel writing, and how many of its core assumptions overlap with those made in the social sciences and development studies. The object is to account for the way concepts informing these trajectories do or do not alter.
Artisan Mobility, Innovation, and the Circulation of Knowledge in Premodern Europe
Volume Editor: David Garrioch
Artisans travelled all over Europe in the pre-modern period, and they were responsible for many technical innovations and new consumer products. This volume moves away from the model of knowledge ‘transfer’ and, drawing on new understandings of artisan work, considers the links between artisan creativity and mobility. Through case studies of different industries, it emphasizes traditions of migration, the experience of moving, and the stimulus provided by new economic and work environments. For both male and female artisans, the weight of these factors varied from one trade to another, and from place to place.
Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid
In Painting Flanders Abroad: Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid, Flemish immigrants and imported Flemish paintings cross the paths of Spanish kings, collectors, dealers, and artists in the Spanish court city, transforming the development and nature of seventeenth-century Spanish painting. Examining these Flemish transplants and the traces their interactions left in archival documents, collection inventories, art treatises, and most saliently Spanish “Golden Age” paintings, this book portrays Spanish society grappling with a long tradition of importing its favorite paintings while struggling to reimagine its own visual idiom. In the process, the book historicizes questions of style, quality, immigration, mobility, identity, and cultural exchange to define what the evolving and amorphous visual concept of “Flemishness” meant to Spanish viewers in an era long before the emergence of nationalism.
From Acceptable Undesirables to Respected Businessmen
Author: Gustavo Guzmán
This is the first book in English to discuss the changing attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jewish immigrants and the State of Israel from the 1930s onwards. Jewish Chileans have ascended rapidly from the status of undesirable immigrants to middle and upper-middle class, facing less obstacles than their Argentine coreligionists. Particular emphasis is given to the failed struggle to extradite war criminal Walther Rauff and to the years of the military dictatorship headed by General Augusto Pinochet. By the 1970s, Israel seemed a strong pro-Western barrier to the expansion of communism and Islamic fundamentalism.