Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,320 items for :

  • East Asian History x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
A Revised Conception of Buddhist Spread in East Asia, 538-710
Author:
In this book, WU Hong deconstructs the prevailing theory of a 100-year Buddhist artistic lag between Asuka Japan and the Chinese mainland. She proposes to radically re-date Asuka statues, such as the famous Hōryūji Kondō Shaka Triad. The new dating opens up possibilities for revising our perceptions of early Japanese history and interchange in East Asia, while also allowing a fresh account of Asuka statuary to emerge.

Proceeding from the revised chronology and emphasizing local processes, this new account brings the growth of Asuka Buddhism into clearer vision and elaborates on heretofore unknown historical details for an enriched understanding of this critical period of East Asian history.
Free access
In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives
Authors: and

Abstract

The Wangkang Festival has been celebrated for nearly two centuries in Melaka, Malaysia. In 2005, it was recognized as part of the national heritage of Malaysia; and in 2020 garnered global recognition with unesco Intangible Cultural Heritage designation. The festival centers on apprehending evil spirits believed to cause epidemics and chaos, while invoking peace and prosperity. The tradition revolves around the worship of Ong Yah, also known as the “Five Sworn Brothers,” making it a vibrant cultural site to study Melaka’s local Chinese identity through Taoist folk religious practices. This article documents the 2020 festival in the midst of the covid pandemic, observes the notable absence and marginalization of women, explores gender constructions through the notion of wu (武) in Chinese masculinity, particularly through the ideal of yingxiong haohan (英雄好漢), and argues that the Chinese community carves out a Chinese public space, identity and presence in Malaysia within the Wangkang Festival context.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives

Abstract

The Communist Party of Malaya (cpm) evolved under the impact of the Cold War. Considering that the cpm was a left-wing political party that had a significant impact on many areas of Malaysia, this study tries to identify and investigate the causes of the cpm’s inability to win the political fight from 1948 to 1989. Both domestic and internal party issues, along with the Cold War scenario, were a significant component that could not be neglected by the researchers.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives

Abstract

Do businesses owned or operated by the Chinese diaspora engage more with China than businesses owned by non-ethnic Chinese? To answer this question, ethnic Chinese owned companies listed on the Malaysian stock exchange were compared with non-Chinese owned/controlled on the extent of their business in China. Of some 800 listed companies as of December 2017, 547 or 68% are Malaysian Chinese companies. Of the latter, some 18.4%, conduct business in China compared to just 8.5% among the non-ethnic Chinese listed companies. This finding needs to be qualified first, by the fact that the companies’ presence in China may not represent a major portion of their business. As some firms do not separate their China- from other Asian businesses, the extent of China engagement is likely to be underestimated. Second, while economic motives were responsible for their presence in China, “cultural citizenship” and family business patriarchs being first or second generations could help explain their affinity to China.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives

Abstract

This article provides an analysis of the cultural meaning of guanxi (關係) in Chinese societies, specifically in the context of a workplace situation in Taiwan. Guanxi is a concept based on Confucian ethics, which was originally a positive concept connoting human closeness, has transformed into a manipulative and instrumentally used variant called “guanxi-practice”(關係學). The article argues that an effective way to understand the cultural meaning of guanxi is to examine the Chinese kinship system, which shares similarities with interpersonal relationships in Chinese culture. The guiding principle of Chinese familial ethics, tong (同), refers to members sharing the same breath who are expected to offer emotional and financial support in times of need. The study analyses the exchange of guanxi-work among men in Taiwanese society to clarify the logic of guanxi operation. The study aims to contribute to the broader discussion on the cultural meaning of guanxi in Chinese societies, explaining why guanxi can empower and entitle participants to seek favors and benefit from one another.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives
Editor:
How did Asia come to be represented on European World maps? When and how did Asian Countries adopt a continental system for understanding the world? How did countries with disparate mapping traditions come to share a basic understanding and vision of the globe?
This series of essays organized into sections on Jesuit Circuits of Communication and Publication; Jesuit World Maps in Chinese; Reverberations of Matteo Ricci's Maps in East Asia; and Reflections on the Curation of Cartographic Knowledge, go a long way toward answering these questions about the shaping of our modern understandings of the world.
A Complex Relationship
Volume Editors: and
Colours make the map: they affect the map’s materiality, content, and handling. With a wide range of approaches, 14 case studies from various disciplines deal with the colouring of maps from different geographical regions and periods. Connected by their focus on the (hand)colouring of the examined maps, the authors demonstrate the potential of the study of colour to enhance our understanding of the material nature and production of maps and the historical, social, geographical and political context in which they were made.

Contributors are: Diana Lange, Benjamin van der Linde, Jörn Seemann, Tomasz Panecki, Chet Van Duzer, Marian Coman, Anne Christine Lien, Juliette Dumasy-Rabineau, Nadja Danilenko, Sang-hoon Jang, Anna Boroffka, Stephanie Zehnle, Haida Liang, Sotiria Kogou, Luke Butler, Elke Papelitzky, Richard Pegg, Lucia Pereira Pardo, Neil Johnston, Rose Mitchell, and Annaleigh Margey.
Author:

Abstract

The geographic works of Matteo Ricci and Ferdinand Verbiest are well-known in the field of cartographic and Chinese studies. The historic connections between the two are also quite clear. This chapter explores geographic treatises and maps by other Jesuit cartographers produced between the appearance of the Ricci and Verbiest maps. The most prominent authors are Martino Martini and Giulio Aleni. The first compiled the Novus Atlas Sinensis (Amsterdam, 1655), the second drafted a world map titled Wanguo quantu [Complete Map of Ten Thousand Countries], 1620 as well as a treatise on world geography, the Zhifang waiji [Unofficial Records on the Foreign Countries] (Hangzhou, 1623) that was originally thought of as a supplement to and explanation of Ricci’s world map. Also covered is the production of Sabatino de Ursis, Diego de Pantoja, Francesco Sambiasi, Niccolò Longobardi, Manuel Diaz, Ludovico Buglio, and Gabriel de Magalhaens, who alongside Chinese scholars and converts contributed to the mapping of China during the course of the 17th century in China.

Open Access
In: Reimagining the Globe and Cultural Exchange: The East Asian Legacies of Matteo Ricci's World Map