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Author: Petr Balcárek
This book offers the first comprehensive study of Byzantine influence on the art and iconography of East Central Europe. Petr Balcárek focuses on the Byzantine cultural and religious legacy in the Czech lands, thereby bringing to light rarely seen images and presenting fresh hypotheses based on newly-explored theological interpretations and historical evidence.

Including a discussion of the Czech and Slovak historiography on Byzantine studies, the work analyses significant artistic and iconographical artefacts in light of the intricate historical and political relationships that shaped Byzantine presence in these territories, comparing them with similar objects from other areas of Byzantine influence in order to draw wide-reaching conclusions.
Volume Editor: Sofia Kotzabassi
What was happening in Byzantium as the Turks drew ever closer to Constantinople and an interest in classical Greek studies had been rekindled in the West? What was the role of the Byzantine scholars in an Empire facing multiple political and economic problems, and what were the matters that engaged them? What was the importance of teachers, libraries and monasteries to the so-called Palaeologan Renaissance, and what the significance of the theological disputes?

These questions and more are addressed in the twelve essays authored by international experts of this Companion, which advances our understanding of the intellectual milieux, trends, and achievements of the Palaeologan period.

Contributors are: Giuseppe De Gregorio, Pantelis Golitsis, Eleni Kaltsogianni, Apostolos Karpozilos, Sofia Kotzabassi, Sophia Mergiali-Sahas, Ioannis Polemis, Alexander Riehle, Demetra Samara, Ilias Taxidis, and Ioannis Vassis.
Why devote a Companion to the "mirrors of princes", whose very existence is debated? These texts offer key insights into political thoughts of the past. Their ambiguous, problematic status further enhances their interest. And although recent research has fundamentally challenged established views of these texts, until now there has been no critical introduction to the genre.
This volume therefore fills this important gap, while promoting a global historical perspective of different “mirrors of princes” traditions from antiquity to humanism, via Byzantium, Persia, Islam, and the medieval West. This Companion also proposes new avenues of reflection on the anchoring of these texts in their historical realities.

Contributors are Makram Abbès, Denise Aigle, Olivier Biaggini, Hugo Bizzarri, Charles F. Briggs, Sylvène Edouard, Jean-Philippe Genet, John R. Lenz, Louise Marlow, Cary J. Nederman, Corinne Peneau, Stéphane Péquignot, Noëlle-Laetitia Perret, Günter Prinzing, Volker Reinhardt, Hans-Joachim Schmidt, Tom Stevenson, Karl Ubl, and Steven J. Williams.
Before serving as Bishop of Constantinople and becoming known to posterity as "the Theologian", Gregory of Nazianzus was an Athens-trained professional teacher of Greek literature. Steeped in the rhetorical culture of the Second Sophistic, his orations for Christian feasts such as Christmas and Pentecost belong to a Classical tradition that privileged the performance of philosophy at festivals. Widely copied and translated, they were instrumental in Gregory becoming one of the most popular and influential authors in Byzantium. This book shows how his orations represent a crucial point in the Late Antique reception of Platonism, rhetorical theory, and ancient festival culture.
Illustrating Byzantine Law through the Sources
This is the first book in English providing a wide range of Byzantine legal sources. In six chapters, this book explains and illustrates Byzantine law through a selection of fundamental Byzantine legal sources, beginning with the sources before the time of Justinian, and extending up to AD 1453.
For all sources English translations are provided next to the original Greek (and Latin) text. In some cases, tables or other features are included that help further elucidate the source and illustrate its nature. The volume offers a clear yet detailed primer to Byzantine law, its sources, and its significance.
Volume Editors: Myrto Veikou and Ingela Nilsson
“Space Matters!” claimed Doreen Massey and John Allen at the heart of the Spatial Turn developments (1984). Compensating a four-decades shortfall, this collective volume is the first reader in Byzantine spatial studies. It contextualizes the spatial turn in historical studies by means of interdisciplinary dialogue. An introduction offers an up-to-date state of the art. Twenty-nine case studies provide a wide range of different conceptualizations of space in Byzantine culture articulated in a single collection through a variety of topics and approaches. An afterword frames the future challenges of Byzantine spatial studies in a changing world where space is a claim and a precarious social value.
Contributors are Ilias Anagnostakis, Alexander Beihammer, Helena Bodin, Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom, Béatrice Caseau Chevallier, Paolo Cesaretti, Michael J. Decker, Veronica della Dora, Rico Franses, Sauro Gelichi, Adam J. Goldwyn, Basema Hamarneh, Richard Hodges, Brad Hostetler, Adam Izdebski, Liz James, P. Nick Kardulias, Isabel Kimmelfield, Tonia Kiousopoulou, Johannes Koder, Derek Krueger, Tomasz Labuk, Maria Leontsini, Yulia Mantova, Charis Messis, Konstantinos Moustakas, Margaret Mullett, Ingela Nilsson, Robert G. Ousterhout, Georgios Pallis, Myrto Veikou, Joanita Vroom, David Westberg, and Enrico Zanini.
Theology in the Writings of an Italian Émigré in Merovingian Gaul
A wandering “Orpheus among the barbarians,” a lively flatterer of the powerful and an appreciator of good food and pleasant company: the sixth-century poet Venantius Fortunatus is known to us today for being all these things. Yet in the Middle Ages people knew and loved “Fortunatus the priest:” a man of the Church and a teacher of Christian dogma.

This book for the first time looks at this other side of Fortunatus’ character through the lens of what he wrote when he was bishop of Poitiers at the end of his life: two sermons and a hymn to the Virgin Mary. Here you will encounter something unexpected: Bishop Fortunatus the stern yet skillful preacher of Augustinian grace and Chalcedonian orthodoxy.
The ninth-century Chronographia of George the Synkellos and Theophanes is the most influential historical text ever written in medieval Constantinople. Yet modern historians have never explained its popularity and power. This interdisciplinary study draws on new manuscript evidence to finally animate the Chronographia’s promise to show attentive readers the present meaning of the past.

Begun by one of the Roman emperor’s most trusted and powerful officials in order to justify a failed revolt, the project became a shockingly ambitious re-writing of time itself—a synthesis of contemporary history, philosophy, and religious practice into a politicized retelling of the human story. Even through radical upheavals of the Byzantine political landscape, the Chronographia’s unique historical vision again and again compelled new readers to chase after the elusive Ends of Time.
Little is known about the Christianization of east-central and eastern Europe, due to the fragmentary nature of the historical record. Yet occasionally, unexpected archaeological discoveries can offer fresh angles and new insights. This volume presents such an example: the discovery of a Byzantine-like church in Alba Iulia, Transylvania, dating from the 10th century - a unique find in terms of both age and function. Next to its ruins, another church was built at the end of the 11th century, following a Roman Catholic architectural model, soon to become the seat of the Latin bishopric of Transylvania.

Who built the older, Byzantine-style church, and what was the political, religious and cultural context of the church? How does this new discovery affect our perception of the ecclesiastical history of Transylvania? A new reading of the archaeological and historical record prompted by these questions is presented here, thereby opening up new challenges for further research.

Contributors are: Daniela Marcu Istrate, Florin Curta, Horia I. Ciugudean, Aurel Dragotă, Monica-Elena Popescu, Călin Cosma, Tudor Sălăgean, Jan Nicolae, Dan Ioan Mureșan, Alexandru Madgearu, Gábor Thoroczkay, Éva Tóth-Révész, Boris Stojkovski, Șerban Turcuș, Adinel C. Dincă, Mihai Kovács, Nicolae Călin Chifăr, Marius Mihail Păsculescu, and Ana Dumitran.