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A Synchronic, Diachronic, and Sociolinguistic Analysis
When I entered her shop, my friend turned to me and said: «Arà, che si dice?» (‘Hey there, how you doing?’). This was not a full-fledged sentence in Italian, as she had thrown a little Sicilian word in – arà. It was a greeting, of course, but also a way of expressing her surprise at seeing me there, and a way of prompting me to start our conversation. The fact she used Sicilian had a clear meaning too: the vernacular indicates a shared social identity.
In a nutshell, this book analyses the cases of Sicilian arà and mentri to understand the complexity of discourse markers: what functions they perform, how they evolve historically, and what their social meaning is in a bilingual speech community.
Volume 1: Interactive, Contrastive, and Cultural Representational Approaches
How do you react to an intercultural situation that you do not understand? There are four options. You wait until it’s over. You adjust your behavior and “do as the natives do.” You blame the other as strange and stupid. Or you start to wonder by thinking about yourself and the other(s). This last option is called a Rich Point. This book provides an overview of research into intercultural communication. It is not a handbook, but offers nine studies that illustrate the reflection process from different scholarly perspectives. The approaches in this volume are the interaction approach, contrastive approach and cultural representational approach.
Volume 2 offers nine additional chapters exemplifying the multilingualism approach and transfer approach including research into intercultural competences. Together, the chapters illustrate the essence of the essentialism and non-essentialism debate regarding diversity and inclusion.
Volume 2: Multilingual and Intercultural Competences Approaches
How do you react to an intercultural situation that you do not understand? There are four options. You wait until it's over. You adjust your behavior and “do as the natives do.” You blame the other as strange and stupid. Or you start to wonder by thinking about yourself and the other(s). This last option is called a Rich Point. This book provides an overview of research into intercultural communication. It is not a handbook but offers nine studies that illustrate the reflection process from different scholarly perspectives. The approaches in this volume are the multilingualism approach and transfer approach including research into intercultural competences. Volume 1 offers nine additional chapters exemplifying the interaction approach, contrastive approach, and cultural representational approach. Together, the chapters illustrate the essence of the essentialism and non-essentialism debate regarding diversity and inclusion.
Yiddish-Slavic Language Contact and its Linguistic Outcome
Yiddish, the language of Eastern-European Jews, has so far been mostly described as Germanic within the framework of the traditional, divergence-based Language Tree Model. Meanwhile, advances in contact linguistics allow for a new approach, placing the idiom within the mixed language spectrum, with the Slavic component playing a significant role. So far, the Slavic elements were studied as isolated, adstratal borrowings. This book argues that they represent a coherent system within the grammar. This suggests that the Slavic languages had at least as much of a constitutive role in the inception and development of Yiddish as German and Hebrew. The volume is copiously illustrated with examples from the vernacular language.
With a contribution of Anna Pilarski, University of Szczecin.
Volume Editors: Nikolaos Lavidas and Kiki Nikiforidou
The volume brings together contributions by scholars working in different theoretical frameworks interested in systematic explanation of language change and the interrelation between current linguistic theories and modern analytical tools and methodology; the integrative basis of all work included in the volume is the special focus on phenomena at the interface of semantics and syntax and the implications of corpus-based, quantitative analyses for researching diachrony.
The issues addressed in the 13 papers include the following: explanations of change in the interface of semantics and syntax; universal constraints and principles of language change (e.g., economy, reanalysis, analogy) and the possibility of predicting language change; constructional approaches to change and their relation to corpus-based research; language contact as an explanation of change and approaches to historical bilingualism and language contact, all on the basis of empirical corpus findings; the challenges of creating diachronic corpora and the question of how quantitative linguistics and diachronic corpora inform explanations of language change variation.
Editor-in-Chief: Peter Bakker
This series deals specifically with contact languages, i.e. new languages that emerged out of contact between two or more ethnolinguistic groups, and includes pidgins, creoles, pidgincreoles, and mixed languages. It welcomes comprehensive grammatical descriptions and collections of grammatical sketches of hitherto undescribed or underdescribed varieties. Creoles and pidgins with both European and non-European lexifiers are of interest. In the case of mixed languages, it is desirable that the components from the different source languages are indicated graphically.

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. Interested scholars should contact the series editor Dr Peter Bakker. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
Nobody can deny that an account of grammatical change that takes written contact into consideration is a significant challenge for any theoretical perspective. Written contact of earlier periods or from a diachronic perspective mainly refers to contact through translation. The present book includes a diachronic dimension in the study of written language contact by examining aspects of the history of translation as related to grammatical changes in English and Greek in a contrastive way. In this respect, emphasis is placed on the analysis of diachronic retranslations: the book examines translations from earlier periods of English and Greek in relation to various grammatical characteristics of these languages in different periods and in comparison to non-translated texts.
Author: Alexander Borg
Deploying a bottom up instead of the conventional top down approach, and drawing extensively on both literary and dialectal Arabic lexical sources, the present glossary proposes and validates the contention of a prehistoric symbiosis transpiring between Ancient Egyptian and Arabic two and a half millennia before the advent of Islam. Its empirical rationale and methodological basis rest firmly on these venerable idioms’ rich textual documentation, yielding the language historian an ample etymological database enriched—in the case of Arabic—with a virtually unlimited corpus drawing on the living speech of some 300 million speakers across the Near East and Africa. The muster provided here comprises over 800 lexemes and reveals, for the first time in longue durée research on Afroasiatic, striking unsuspected commonalities linking Old Egyptian to Yemeni Arabic.
In: Journal of Language Contact