Browse results

Indo-Muslim and Portuguese History, Urban Fabric and Architecture
The ex-Portuguese Island of Diu – a once strategic maritime gateway to the bay of Cambay, Gujarat, India – features in the corpus of Portuguese history and literature, but a comprehensive study of the island was lacking. Mehrdad and Natalie Shokoohy, known for surveying little-known historic sites in India, present the study of the built environment of Diu in conjunction with the contemporaneous Indian histories in Arabic and Persian, resulting in a fresh view of Indian Ocean commerce and conquest. Extensive surveys of the Fort, the Town and the Island, include the epigraphy, fortifications, urban fabric, mosques, shrines, churches, monasteries, water infrastructure and the Zoroastrian Fire Temple and Towers of Silence. Fragmentary Hindu and Jain archaeological remains are also noted.
Cihānnümā is the summa of Ottoman geography and one of the axial texts of Islamic intellectual history. Kātib Çelebi (d. 1657) sought to combine the Islamic geographical tradition with the new European discoveries, atlases and surveys. His cosmography included a comprehensive description of the regions of the world, extending westward from Japan and as far as the eastern Ottoman provinces. Ebū Bekr b. Behrām ed-Dimaşḳī (d. 1691) continued with a survey of the Arab countries and the remaining Ottoman provinces of Anatolia. İbrāhīm Müteferriḳa combined the two, with additional notes and maps of his own, in one of the earliest Ottoman printed books, Kitāb-ı Cihānnümā (1732).
Our translation includes the entire text of Müteferriḳa’s edition, distinguishing clearly between the contributions of the three authors. Based on Kātib Çelebi’s original manuscript we have made hundreds of corrections to Müteferriḳa’s text. Additional corrections are based on comparison with Kātib Çelebi’s Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Latin and Italian sources.
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
In: An Ottoman Cosmography
Author:

Abstract

The introduction to this volume situates the question of the transmission of geographical material within the broader question of the transmission and exchange of knowledge between the Arabic-Islamic world and Christian Europe from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. It provides an orientation on the subject of medieval Christian European and Arabic-Islamic maps, reviews the evidence presented to date for interaction between the two traditions, and outlines the nature of the contributions to follow.

In: Cartography between Christian Europe and the Arabic-Islamic World, 1100-1500

The conclusion to this volume reviews the arguments and materials presented in the preceding chapters to assess the picture provided of contacts, transmission, influence and difference between Arabic-Islamic and Christian European traditions. It identifies the areas in which contacts and transmission clearly occurred, those where they clearly did not, and others where questions remain open. It also considers models that draw attention to shared knowledge and interests, rather than specific moments of transfer. The authors propose four major barriers that impeded transmission, and four areas which offer possibilities for further comparative research on medieval Christian European and Arabic-Islamic mapmaking and geographical culture.

In: Cartography between Christian Europe and the Arabic-Islamic World, 1100-1500