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In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
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In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review

Abstract

This article presents Malevich’s explanation and indeed justification for the new art, including his own objectless art of Suprematism. He divides the history of art into two trends – figurative art, which relies on an identifiable subject matter to convey any spiritual sensations, and non-figurative art in which sensations are evoked through the mixing of colors, the fabric of the painterly structure – “painting as such” and “color painting” (tsvetopis’). Much of the text focuses on Cezanne who expressed the nature of painting so powerfully in works like The Bottom of the Ravine (1879) and The Card Players (1890–1892). Malevich compares his “painterly realism” to the “illusory” realism of figurative artists, such as Ivan Shishkin and Ilia Repin. This article is translated and edited by Alexander Bouras and Maria Kokkori.

In: Experiment
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Abstract

This article looks at the way in which the work of Paul Cezanne and the theory and practice of Cub-ism were integral to the pedagogical system that Kazimir Malevich developed while working at the State Free Art Studios in Vitebsk 1920–1922. The article focuses, in particular, on the role of the Cub-ism workshop, which was run by Vera Ermolaeva, who had studied in Paris. In the initial stages, students studied Cezanne’s approach to painting, before progressing to Cubism. Thanks to the work of Malevich and his colleagues, several students mastered the first stage of the artist’s pedagogi-cal system.

In: Experiment

Abstract

This article argues that the work of Paul Cezanne may have been a factor in encouraging young archi-tects in Russia to abandon the approaches and styles of the past and develop a new type of architecture in the years immediately following the Revolution of October 1917. The focus is on the early work of the architect Vladimir Krinskii, who in the 1920s worked with Nikolai Ladovskii in formulating the Rationalist approach to architecture. He later stressed how important the art of Cezanne and the avant-garde art had been for him and other young architects in developing a modernist aesthetic. This article examines Krinskii’s statements about Cezanne and relates them to the experimental sketches that the architect produced in 1919.

In: Experiment