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Volume Editor: Pénélope Larzillière
Are artistic engagements evolving, or attracting more attention? The range of artistic protest actions shows how the globalisation of art is also the globalisation of art politics. Here, based on a multi-site field research, we follow artists from the MENA countries, Latin America, or Africa along their paths of commitment and transnational, voluntary trajectories or exiles. With this global and decentred approach, the different repertoires of engagement appear, in all their dimensions, including professional ones. In the face of political disillusionment, these aesthetic interventions take on new meanings, as artivists seek alternative modes of social transformation and production of shared values.

Contributors are: Alice Aterianus-Owanga, Sébastien Boulay, Sarah Dornhof, Simon Dubois, Shyam Iskander, Sabrina Melenotte, Franck Mermier, Rayane Al Rammal, Kirsten Scheid, Pinar Selek, and Marion Slitine.

Abstract

A sample of 299 young people between the ages of 12 and 18 attending a week-long summer youth programme sponsored by the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada completed the Adolescent form of the Francis Psychological Type Scales together with the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity. The data demonstrated that a more positive attitude toward Christianity was associated with a preference for feeling (rather than thinking) and with a preference for judging (rather than perceiving), and that retention rates were lower for extraverts and for intuitive types. The article concludes by recommending psychological type awareness courses within youth ministry training programmes to enhance understanding attrition and retention of young people within Christian activities.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

In worship with children, participants of all ages pray to God, act in ways that assume God’s presence, play out Biblical stories and speak about God. This raises the question, How is God ‘performed’ with children? In other words, how is God staged through performative acting? The article draws on ethnographic data from Dutch Protestant contexts. The four analysed performances emphasise affective knowledge of God and perform God as a God who accepts children as children, resurrects and helps, but whose existence can be discussed. Like in the other seventeen researched worship practices, God is performed through story, ritual and play. Analysis of interviews with youth work professionals highlights the importance of the sensory experience of stories, the creation of a ritual space, and the creative tension between children’s play and liturgical play. The article concludes that the performance of God is target-group related, contextual and embedded in the interactions between adults and children. Above all, performing God with children is embodied theology.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

Theological reflection is a much discussed and written about form of theological practice within youth ministry and is taught as a core component in theological training in the UK. This article discusses research into the practice of theological reflection by Christian youth workers in the UK. It compares and contrasts the understanding and use of theological reflection by those with and without formal training. The research reveals similar attitudes toward and practices of theological reflection by both groups, but more regular usage by those with training. Further, the research showed limited forms of theological reflection were being used and as such this article explores the implications of this and makes several recommendations for developing both training and practice of Christian youth workers.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology

Abstract

Young people today are both likely to bear the brunt of the long-term problems caused by the covid-19 pandemic and face other kinds of outbreaks or pandemics in the future. In that kind of unprecedented situation, the world offers us hope to recover from today’s pandemic and to prevent other outbreaks or pandemics in the future. This study will focus on a theological reflection on hope concerning pandemic threats offered in popular culture. Specifically, using the revised correlational method, this study will explore how the theological reflection on the concept of hope in Netflix’s Pandemic docuseries could help young people to live with an embodied hope in a pandemic threat. This theological reflection will offer embodied hope as a theological perspective for young people to embody their limitations as embodied beings while enacting their eschatological hope in pandemic threats.

In: Journal of Youth and Theology
This book is an introduction to the role played by Spanish formal education in providing feminist pedagogies to adolescents and young people, throughout the first two decades of the 21st century. The images of Spanish feminist protests in recent years, with a considerable presence of young girls but also boys, have spread around the world. But what is their relationship with gender-based inequalities? What is the role of formal education in their understanding of social reality? The authors combine a sociological and historical analysis of the social and educational changes that have taken place in Spanish youth during these decades, with a pedagogical orientation towards practice.

Abstract

This book is an introduction to the role played by Spanish formal education in providing feminist pedagogies to adolescents and young people, throughout the first two decades of the 21st century. The images of Spanish feminist protests in recent years, with a considerable presence of young girls but also boys, have spread around the world. But what is their relationship with gender-based inequalities? What is the role of formal education in their understanding of social reality? A sociological and historical analysis of the social and educational changes that have taken place in Spanish youth during these decades are combined, with a pedagogical orientation towards practice.

In: Gender, Youth and Education in Early 21st Century Spain
Doing Youth Studies in Spain and Latin America
Youth studies in Latin America and Spain face numerous challenges. This book delves into youth experiences in the 21st century, shaped by complex and pressing issues: the surge of youth cultures and groups, visual images of youth throughout time, and fragmented youth experiences in radically unequal societies. It analyzes young people as precarious natives in global capitalism and labor uncertainty, juvenicide, feminist discourse, social networks, intimacy and sexual affection among young people in a context of growing claims of gender equality. Also included are rural and indigenous youth as political actors, the actions of young political activists within government administrations, the experience of youth migration and empowerment, and young people dealing with the digital world. How have youth studies approached these issues in Latin America and Spain? Which were the main developments and transformations in this research field over the past years? Where is it heading?

Contributors are: Jorge Benedicto, Maritza Urteaga, Dolores Rocca, José Antonio Pérez Islas, Juan Carlos Revilla, Mariano Urraco, Almudena Moreno, Óscar Aguilera, Marcela Saá, Rafael Merino, Ana Miranda, Carles Feixa, Gonzalo Saraví, Antonio Santos-Ortega, David Muñoz-Rodríguez, Arantxa Grau-Muñoz, José Manuel Valenzuela, Silvia Elizalde, Mónica Figueras, Mittzy Arciniega, Nele Hansen, Tanja Strecker, Elisa G. de Castro, Melina Vázquez, René Unda, Daniel Llanos, Sonia Páez de la Torre, Pere Soler, Daniel Calderón, and Stribor Kuric.

Abstract

This chapter offers an overview of the development of youth studies in Spain over the last forty years. Firstly, we analyze social images of youth in relation to the social and political changes in the Spanish society. These images of youth reflect the contradictory way that adult society views young people. The second part analyzes the main research findings in youth studies, with emphasis on the similarities and differences between social images and research results. The analysis also focuses on identifying manifestations of youth diversity, particularly social class and gender differences. We analyze the changes and internal differences within the youth population in their values and attitudes towards politics. Then, we explore the dominant image of precariousness currently associated with youth, contemplating the postponement of transitions and, above all, class differences. Later, we outline how youth studies have contributed to de-problematizing many subcultural manifestations of youth by framing them as symbolic constructions that are also affected by structural differences. Finally, emphasis is placed on the diversity of manifestations of youth sociability. The chapter concludes by attempting to identify the differences between young people in each of the dimensions explored, with the aim of fostering diversity as a crosscutting issue.

In: Young People in Complex and Unequal Societies
In: Young People in Complex and Unequal Societies