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Volume II: Popculture, Environment, Colonialism and Migration
With Africa as its point of reference and departure, volume II of Africa's Radicalisms and Conservatisms examines why and how the two concepts – radicalisms and conservatisms – should not be taken as mere binaries around which to organize knowledge. It demonstrates that these concepts have multiple and diverse meanings as perceived and understood from different disciplinary vantage points, hence, the deliberate pluralization of the terms. The essays show what happens when one juxtaposes the two concepts and how they are easily intertwined when different peoples’ lived experiences of politics, pop-culture, democracy, liberalism, the environment, colonialism, migration, identities, and knowledge, etc. across the length and breadth of Africa are brought to bear on our understandings of these two particularisms.

Contributors are: Adesoji Oni, Admire M. Nyamwanza, Akin Tella, Akinpelu Ayokunnu Oyekunle, Bamidele Omotunde Alabi, Charles Nkem Okolie, Craig Calhoun, Diana Ekor Ofana, Edwin Etieyibo, Folusho Ayodeji, Gabriel Akinbode, Godwin Oboh, Joseph C. A. Agbakoba, Julius Niringiyimana, Lucky Uchenna Ogbonnaya, Maxwell Mudhara, Muchaparara Musemwa, Nathan Osareme Odiase, Obvious Katsaura, Okpowhoavotu Dan Ekere, Olaniran Olakunle Lateef, Omolara V. Akinyemi, Owen Mafongoya, Paramu Mafongoya, Philip Onyekachukwu Egbule, Rutanga Murindwa, Sandra Bhatasara, Takesure Taringana, Tunde A. Abioro, Victor Clement Nweke, William Muhumuza, and Zainab M. Olaitan.
Following the Tea Ritual from China to West Africa
Green tea, imported from China, occupies an important place in the daily lives of Malians. They spend so much time preparing and consuming the sugared beverage that it became the country’s national drink. To find out how Malians came to practice the tea ritual, this study follows the beverage from China to Mali on its historical trade routes halfway around the globe. It examines the circumstances of its introduction, the course of the tea ritual, the equipment to prepare and consume it, and the meanings that it assumed in the various places on its travel across geographical regions, political economies, cultural contexts, and religious affiliations.
Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images is a Festschrift offered to Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, curator of Arabic manuscripts at the BNF, codicologist and specialist in Arabic manuscript books, on the occasion of her retirement.
It brings together fourteen original contributions for which the collections of the BNF provided an essential source. Handwritten transmission in Islam over the long period is the central axis of the volume. New hypotheses are emerging, both on questions of transmission by shaykhs or scribe-painters and the circulation of ideas, texts and knowledge, as well as on the status and attribution of writings, the making of books, and the history of libraries.

Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images sont des mélanges offerts à Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, conservatrice des manuscrits arabes à la BNF, codicologue et spécialiste du livre manuscrit arabe, à l’occasion de son départ à la retraite. Il réunit quatorze contributions originales dont les collections de la BnF forment une source essentielle. La transmission écrite en Islam sur la longue période est l’axe central du volume. De nouvelles hypothèses emergent, aussi bien sur les questions de transmission par les shaykhs ou les scribes-peintres, de circulation des idées, des textes et des savoirs que de statut et d’attribution des écrits, de fabrication du livre et d’histoire des bibliothèques.

Avec: Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri
Author: Andrew Burnett
Were the Dutch-Africans in southern Africa a brother nation to the Dutch or did they simply represent a lost colony? Connecting primary sources in Dutch and Afrikaans, this work tells the story of the Dutch stamverwantschap (kinship) movement between 1847 and 1900. The white Dutch-Africans were imagined to be the bridgehead to a broader Dutch identity – a ‘second Netherlands’ in the south. This study explores how the 19th century Dutch identified with and idealised a pastoral community operating within a racially segregated society on the edge of European civilisation. When the stamverwantschap dream collided with British military and economic power, the belief that race, language and religion could sustain a broader Dutch identity proved to be an illusion.
Author: Karen Horn

Abstract

The Italian prisoner-of-war (POW) experience in the Union of South Africa is not well represented in scholarly publications. Research on this topic tends to focus on the general feeling of partnership between captors and captives that came about after 1943, when a new camp commandant was appointed at Zonderwater, the largest POW camp in the Union. There is no doubt that POW s and military authorities shared a mindset cooperation, but it represents one interpretation only. With educational, cultural, and sporting programmes arranged by welfare officers, many POW s gained skills and positive experiences from their captivity. However, POW s arrived early in 1941, when Zonderwater and its staff were ill-prepared for the challenges that awaited them. From 1941 to 1942 the camp commandant, Colonel DW de Wet, attempted but failed to manage the camp according to the regulations set out by the Geneva Convention of 1929 for the treatment of prisoners-of-war, of which the Union was a signatory. This article looks at the causes of De Wet’s apparent failure and the consequences thereof on the prisoners, the camp staff and to a smaller extent, on the Union government.

In: Journal of African Military History
In: Journal of African Military History
Free access
In: Journal of African Military History

Abstract

During the Second World War, between 1941 and 1942, a large number of South African troops were made prisoners of war (POW) by the Axis forces in the Western Desert. These troops were first interned in POW transit camps in North Africa, before being shipped to more permanent camps in Italy and later Germany. A large number of the South African captives decided to accept their newfound fates and make their internment as ‘pleasant’ as possible. However, a small nucleus of South African servicemen either tried to evade capture altogether, or, when captured, actively tried to escape. The first large scale attempts of escape and evasion by South African servicemen therefore occurred in North Africa between 1941 and 1942. This article provides an exploratory investigation into the varied experiences of the South African soldiers that either evaded capture altogether or escaped from internment in North Africa.

In: Journal of African Military History