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African Studies at the Crossroads
This book emerges at a time when critical race studies, postcolonial thought, and decolonial theory are under enormous pressure as part of a global conservative backlash. However, this is also an exciting moment, where new horizons of knowledge appear and new epistemic practices (e.g. symmetry, collaboration, undisciplining) gain traction. Through our critical engagements with structural, relational, and personal aspects of knowing and unknowing we work towards a greater multiplicity of knowledges and practices. Calling into question the asymmetrical global economy of knowledge and its uneven division of intellectual labour, our interdisciplinary volume explores what a decolonial horizon could entail for African Studies at the crossroads.

Contributors are Akosua Adomako Ampofo, Eric A. Anchimbe, Edwin Asa Adjei, Susan Arndt, Muyiwa Falaiye, Katharina Greven, Christine Hanke, Amanda Hlengwa, Catherine Kiprop, Elísio Macamo, Nelson Maldonado-Torres, Cassandra Mark-Thiesen, Lena Naumann, Thando Njovane, Samuel Ntewusu, Anthony Okeregbe, Zandisiwe Radebe, Elelwani Ramugondo, Eleanor Schaumann
Volume Editors: and
One of the great challenges of our time is related to the circulation of technology. We argue that while circulation leads to global technicisation, it also allows for the emergence of a zone of decolonial translation. Since this zone will always be contested, it needs to be constantly recreated and maintained. The main aim of this volume, with its six case studies, is to stimulate debate and many more curious praxiographic studies on this endeavour.

Contributors are Sarah Biecker, Marc Boeckler, Jude Kagoro, Jochen Monstadt, Sung-Joon Park, Eva Riedke, Richard Rottenburg, Klaus Schlichte, Jannik Schritt, Alena Thiel, Christiane Tristl, Jonas van der Straeten.
Analysing the Spectrum of Muslim Social Mobilization during the Internet Age
Author:
This book is the first ‘groundwork’ on Muslim NGOs in contemporary Ghana. It builds upon a database of more than 600 Muslim non-profit associations, foundations and grass-roots organisations whose activities are traced through extensive use of social media. The first part of the book scrutinises the varieties of their activities and operational spaces, their campaigns and target groups, alongside their local, regional, national and international connections. The second part analyses contemporary debates on infaq, sadaqa, waqf and zakat as well as Islamic banking and micro-finance schemes for promoting social welfare among Muslim communities in Ghana.
The informal sector is a vital sustainer of the African economy, employing more than 60% of sub-Saharan Africans. The book examines diverse segments of the informal sector, putting into consideration their structure, dynamics, resilience and gender issues. Chapters are based on empirical research on women in the transport sector, vehicle maintenance artisanship, graduates in the informal sector, COVID 19, and the informal economy. Other chapters focus on the indigenous usury finance system, coconut oil production, herbal medicine, and the gig economy across countries including Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Togo, and Burkina Faso.
Volume Editors: , , and
This interdisciplinary volume provides a comprehensive and rich analysis of the century-long socio-ecological transformation of Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Major globalised processes of agricultural intensification, biodiversity conservation efforts, and natural-resource extraction have simultaneously manifested themselves in this one location.

These processes have roots in the colonial period and have intensified in the past decades, after the establishment of the cut-flower industry and the geothermal-energy industry. The chapters in this volume exemplify the multiple, intertwined socio-environmental crises that consequently have played out in Naivasha in the past and the present, and that continue to shape its future.
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Abstract

This study examines border market and its health implications for Seme border residents. The development of border markets, and their transformation is traceable to the influx of migrants and huge cross-border activities. The border markets have become sanctuaries for miscreants, criminal elements, and human traffickers. Studies have focused attention on the criminality and boundary dispute at the border without giving much research attention to the border markets, traders, effect of infiltration of fake drugs and its health implications. The socio-ecological theory was adopted as the theoretical orientation. The methodology involve the use of primary data which include: participant observation, in-depth interview (10) and Focus Group Discussion (5). Analysis of collected data was done through content analysis with the aid of NVIVO Software. The border market in Seme is largely due to the porosity of the border which encourages influx of goods through both legal and illegal routes, health consequences of which include, high rate of morbidity due to fake drugs, increase insecurity, loss of traditional norms and values, high crime rate, and lack of social infrastructure. These deserve urgent government policy attention to eradicate these societal menaces.

In: The African Informal Economy

Abstract

Artisans form a large percentage of the workforce in the informal sector of Nigeria’s economy and the importance of their activities to the growth of the economy cannot be overemphasized. This research investigates the business networking among Auto-artisans in Ibadan, Nigeria. It specifically examines the formation of Mechanic Villages in Ibadan, the structure of the selected Mechanic Villages, and the context of business networking among Auto-artisans in those selected mechanic villages. It reveals that Auto-artisan villages are integral to economic sustenance, environmental pollution reduction and social networking in Ibadan. Auto-artisans adopt Associational networking to enhance economic problems solution. However, inadequate knowledge of advanced automobile technology, non-availability of modern equipment and spare parts are their major challenges to the artisans. Political instability, epileptic electricity supply, non-availability of water and congestion in mechanic villages also deter activities in Mechanic villages. The study uncovers the interplay of the artisans and partisan politicians; Politicians need the auto-mobile informal sector for elections while auto-mobile artisans need the politicians for suitable policies to ensure the sustenance of mechanic village location. The business networking, along with internal hierarchical organization and urbanization are the major factors embedded in survival of artisans as well as mechanic villages in Ibadan.

In: The African Informal Economy

Abstract

Coconut oil production is a major industry in the Nigerian informal sector. Coconut oil production is a profitable venture and a major employer of informal labour. Badagry is a major coconut oil-producing community in Nigeria, and its produce are sold both locally and internationally. The study, therefore, examined the production process, marketing networks and challenges of the coconut industry in Badagry, Nigeria. Data were collected through observation, 8 key informant interviews and 37 in-depth interviews. The production of coconut oil goes through three different stages including materials preparation, milk extraction and oil extraction. Despite its vibrancy, the industry is still limited by manual production and simple machinery. The marketing networks of coconut oil production are largely based on the family system and traders’ association. The traders have attempted to modernise sales through product labelling and packaging, and social media adverts. The major challenges of the industry include raw material shortages, poor capital, poor machinery and work-induced health challenges. The producers cope through mutual and associational dependence, and they also augment raw materials by importing coconut from Ghana, Togo and other countries along the West African coast.

In: The African Informal Economy