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Damascus under the Mamlūk sultans (1260–1516 CE)
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The goals and tactics of a state's ruling elite influence its artistic and architectural output, shaping the overall characteristics, orientation, and themes of its creations. Architecture reflects political ideology and historical events, showcasing the power and cultural values of the state, with implications for politics and authority.
This book presents a comprehensive and nuanced exploration of the intricate interplay between art, politics, and religion within the architectural legacy of Mamluk Damascus. It sheds light on how these dynamics enrich our comprehension of the past and contribute to contemporary dialogues concerning the preservation of cultural heritage.
In: Imperial Ideology and Architecture
In: Imperial Ideology and Architecture
In: Imperial Ideology and Architecture
In: Imperial Ideology and Architecture
This book examines the art markets of the Global South while questioning, based on the heterogeneity of the selected contributions, the very idea of its existence in the context of the global art market. Gathering new research by recognized scholars, you will discover different markets from the so-called Global South, their structure, the external determinants affecting their behavior, their role in the art system’s development, and how they articulate with other agents at the local, regional, and international level. In this publication, an important wealth of research on various African countries stands out, providing an unprecedented overview of the markets in that region.

This volume originates from the TIAMSA conference The Art Market and the Global South: New Perspectives and Plural Approaches, held in Lisbon in 2019.

Abstract

The paper takes up the issue of international trade in art from the Global South perspective. Leaving on the margin the most important countries for the matter in question, i.e. the United States of America, some European countries (Great Britain, France, Germany, Switzerland) and China, attention is focused on the emerging economies of the southern hemisphere: South America, Africa, India, and South-Eastern Asia. The aim of the paper is to identify the value, directions, and indicators of international art trade in Global South countries. The analysis is based on the UN Comtrade database and International Trade Center (ITC) statistics. The export and import of products classified as commodity group 97 (works of art, collectors’ pieces) and antiques are analyzed.

An analysis of value of the international art trade is presented. Special attention is given to trade balance indicators (negative or positive). Based on the data gathered, the directions of international art trade are identified in the selected Global South countries. Furthermore, the concentration of exporting countries and the average distance between them and their destination countries is presented; the same is done for importing countries. The measure of concentration is based on the Herfindahl index (also known as Herfindahl–Hirschman Index, HHI, or sometimes HHI-score). The source of the data for the geographical distance between two countries is CEPII (Centre d’Etudes Prospectives et d’Informations Internationales) data. The paper also has a cognitive and empirical character. The analysis of data enables to achieve new perspectives that can be observed in the current art trade seen from the Global South. Advanced visualizations of the geographical structure of the international art trade in the discussed regions are also presented in the article.

In: The Art Market and the Global South

Abstract

Raffaella Frascarelli and Valerio Rocco Orlando’s ongoing research South of Imagination recognizes in the cultural horizon of the Global South the social resource required to establish an unconventional educational experience at Matera in a state-owned building granted to the artist for the next thirty years. The Epistemologies of the South by Boaventura de Sousa Santos and the Southern Question by Antonio Gramsci foster this process. A series of workshops involving independent and multidisciplinary communities of artists Adrian Paci in Shkodër (Art House), Wael Shawky in Alexandria (MASS,) Yto Barrada in Tangier (Cinémathèque de Tanger) represent the educational action able to draw on the unconventional knowledge of the southern demo- diversities.

The paper investigates the sociocultural and economic perspectives of the Global South new art markets, their effects on the interaction between aesthetics and economy, and their influence on the development of independent cultural processes. The endeavors of these new art markets to create and redistribute aesthetic, sociocultural, and economic values in Southern Europe, Middle Eastern countries and Africa are assessed along with the “glocal” dimension and the molecular collaboration of artists collectives who, while disentangling and deconstructing the myth of individual creativity, are transforming the art market as well.

In: The Art Market and the Global South

Abstract

This chapter discusses the extent to which the Turkish art market has been internationalized by focusing on the case of the Contemporary Istanbul Art Fair, the major art market event in the country. We examine this case as an instance of a broader phenomenon: the internationalization of art markets in emerging economies and their contribution to the global art market. The data we draw upon mainly comes from two sources: annual catalogs providing information on artists and galleries participating in the event and the artworks exhibited, along with annual activity reports of the organization that mostly provides statistical information on the event in different aspects. Utilizing the data and the available secondary literature, we organize our discussion on internationalization around three analytical aspects: galleries and dealers, visitors and collectors, and artists and artworks. Overall, we suggest that the Contemporary Istanbul Art Fair has gained considerable ground in becoming an international art event by carving out a niche for itself in the global art scene even though its status in terms of reputation and commercial size is not analogous to the art fairs that constitute the center of the global art market.

In: The Art Market and the Global South
In: The Art Market and the Global South