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The definition of a healthcare system evolves continuously, becoming broader and more complex with each rendering. Healthcare systems can consist of many different elements, including but not limited to: access to comprehensive medical care, health promotion, disease prevention, institutional framework, financing schemes, government responsibility over health, etc. In light of its broad classification of healthcare, this book focuses on a wide spectrum of health-related issues ranging from risk factors for disease to medical treatment and possible frameworks for healthcare systems. Aging populations, increasing costs of healthcare, advancing technology, and challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic require an innovative conceptual and methodological framework. By combining the experience and effort of researchers from a variety of fields including mathematics, medicine and economics, this book offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying health-related issues. It contributes to the existing literature by integrating the perspective of treatment with the economic determinants of health care outcomes, such as population density, access to financial resources and institutional frameworks. It also provides new evidence regarding the pharmaceutical industry including innovation, international trade and company performance.

Contributors are: Sayansk Da Silva, Joe Feinglass, Scott W. Hegerty, Joseph E. Hibdon, Jr, Arkadiusz Michał Kowalski, Małgorzata Stefania Lewandowska, Dawid Majcherek, Ewelina Nojszewska, Izabela Pruchnicka-Grabias, Agata Sielska and Julian Smółka.
Author: Marcel Danesi
In Pi (π) in Nature, Art, and Culture Marcel Danesi revisits the importance of π as a pattern in the structure of reality, fitting in with the Pythagorean view of Order. Pi has cropped up in formulas that describe natural and physical structures which, on the surface, seem to have nothing to do with a circle, but might harbor the archetype of circularity as a principle.

Through π, this book thus revisits the implicit ancient Greek view that geometry was a 'hermeneutic science,' a discipline aiming to investigate the connectivity among numbers, shapes, and natural phenomena. It also examines its manifestations in aesthetic, symbolic and cultural structures, which point to an abiding fascination with the circle as an unconscious archetype. Hermeneutic geometry is ultimately about the exploration of the meanings of geometric-mathematical notions to science and human life.
Author: Yair Neuman
The old practices of interpretation have been exhausted, and the humanities and social sciences are facing a crisis. Is there a way out of the labyrinth of reading? In this book, Professor Neuman presents a challenging approach to interpreting texts and reading literature through the spectacles of conceptual mathematics. This approach strives to avoid the simplicity of a quantitative approach to the analysis of literature as well as both the relativistic and the ideological dangers facing a qualitative reading of a text. The approach is introduced in a rigorous and accessible manner and woven with insights gained from various fields. Taking us on a challenging journey from Ovid’s Metamorphoses to Nick Cave’s The Death of Bunny Munro, the book shows how we may gain a deeper understanding of literature and the aesthetic experience of reading.
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this concluding chapter, I explain why literature is not a simple form of entertainment; provide an overview of how to understand a novel in depth; show how the artistic imagination is formed through non-trivial similarities, comparisons and inferences triggered by a text; weave a link from a cartoon by Raphael to the Stabat Mater; and conclude with a call for a deep and modest reading of literature.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we learn how to model a novel as a dynamical system, the nature of a structure-preserving transformation between dynamical systems, how we may use this idea to understand Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom’s different systems of relationships in John Updike’s Rabbit, Run (1960/1964), why animalistic sexual urges are not the best explanation for this character’s whimsical behavior, and how The Kreutzer Sonata (Tolstoy, / illustrates the fickle nature of personal relationships.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we learn how complex meta-fiction can be, why a loophole is necessary to understand reflective novels, how to better understand Dennis Potter’s Hide and Seek (1973) through the idea of the reflective subcategory, and why a pipe is not always a pipe.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we are introduced to the difficulty of reading, why conceptual mathematics may help us to understand literature, and how what was once called an “idiot savant” and a bunch of talented cartographers can teach us about concrete and abstract nonsense.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we learn how the idea of a fixed point may help us to understand Milan Kundera’s novel Identity (1998), how Banach’s fixed-point theorem may help us to understand what happens to the hero of Kafka’s The Metamorphosis (1968), what C. S. Peirce can teach us about the self, and how retracts and idempotents may help us to resolve the problem of personal identity and the way it is formed in literature.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we learn why dimensionality is important in understanding the complexity of the novel, how repetitions are clues to dimensionality, how to think about dimensionality in terms of orthogonal morphisms, and the meaning of the turd that appears in Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections (2001).

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature
Author: Yair Neuman

Abstract

In this chapter, we learn how the idea of natural transformation may help us to understand multiple perspectives in literature, how the idea of an adjoint functor may help us in modeling back-translation, and how category theory can help us to understand the disturbed mind of Bunny Munro.

In: Conceptual Mathematics and Literature