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Series Editors: Ole Karsholt and Marko Mutanen
Editorial Board / Council Member: Zdeněk Laštůvka and Sergey Sinev
A series intended to be a tool for identifying the European micro-moths. Each volume will treat a systematic unit comprising about 100-300 species. This will usually mean a family or subfamily, but it can also be a single large genus, or a group of smaller families. Small and systematically unrelated groups may also be collected in one volume. The geographical area covered will be Europe west of the former U.S.S.R., and include the Baltic countries. Authors may also include the adjacent parts of the western Palaearctic Region, i.e. Macaronesia, North Africa, Cyprus, Turkey, the European part of the former U.S.S.R., as well as Transcaucasia. Each volume will illustrate the adults of all species in full colour, either by colour photographs or water-colours. Sexual dimorphism and extensive polymorphism will also be illustrated. All species, except the largest, will be shown enlarged.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson.
For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.

Abstract

The present study examines the phylogeography of Pholidopterini (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae), a lineage distributed in the East Mediterranean and estimated substitution rates for the three mitochondrial and two nuclear gene segments. The last common ancestor of Pholidopterini was dated to 18 myr ago, in Early Miocene. Phylogeography of the lineage was marked with three waves of radiations, first during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum, the second during the Serravallian, and third during the ending of Messinian. The substitution rate estimations were 0.0187/0.018/0.0141/0.0010207 s/s/myr for COI/ND2/12S-tRNAval-6S/ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2. The following main conclusions were drawn; (i) Radiation of Pholidopterini directed by the climatic shifts, (ii) signs of vicariant speciation were poor, contrary to the active tectonic history, (iii) the ultimate generic ancestors were dated to the Langhian and Serravallian, and (vi) the Tortonian transgression of Mid-Aegean Trench appears to be a reliable geographic calibration point for lineage splitting between Crete and Anatolia.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

We summarize the knowledge on Australian Cylapinae and review all recorded genera. Two species, Lygaeoscytus carnarvon sp. nov. and Phyllofulvius tarkine sp. nov., are described as new to science. Schizopteromiris Schuh, S. lordhowensis Schuh, S. montheithi Schuh, S. queenslandensis Schuh, Howefulvius Schmitz & Stys, H. elytratus Schmitz & Stys, Lygaeoscytus Reuter, Lygaeoscytus cimicoides Reuter, Phyllofulvius Carvalho and Phyllofulvius australianus Carvalho are redescribed. Rhinomiriella Gorczyca is synonymised with Ceratofulvius Reuter. Cylapofulvius listeri Izzard is transferred to Micanitropis Namyatova & Cassis. Peritropisca Carvalho & Lorenzato is recorded from Australia for the first time. The identification key to Australian genera, images of some holotypes, diagnoses, digital habitus images, scanning electron micrographs, illustration of genitalia and distribution maps are provided for new species and some other taxa. Considering the results of this work, 23 genera and 48 species of Cylapinae are currently recorded from Australia. The distribution and collection techniques are discussed.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Here we revise the taxonomy of the South American genus Raysymmela and perform a phylogenetic analysis based on 126 morphological characters. We propose one new synonym, Raysymmela pallipes () (= Symmela boliviensis syn. n.), and three new combinations, Raysymmela costaricensis () comb. n., Raysymmela seticollis () comb. n., and Raysymmela varians () comb. n. Two new species are described: Raysymmela equatorialis sp. n. (Ecuador) and R. erwini sp. n. (Bolivia). Lectotypes of following taxa were designated: Symmela boliviensis , S. bruchi , S. costaricensis , S. curtula , S. pallipes Blanchard, 1850, S. seticollis , and S. varians Erichson, 1847. Species are redescribed and a key to species is given, external morphological features as well as aedeagus are illustrated for all taxa. Distribution maps as well as a key to currently known South American genera of Sericini are provided. From phylogenetic analysis using parsimony, Raysymmela is not recovered as monophyletic.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

The Neotropical ant-parasitic genus Neodohrniphora Malloch is revised based on female specimens. Herein, eleven species are studied, seven of which are new to science: N. canina sp. nov., N. gigantea sp. nov., N. mokana sp. nov., N. pseudoacromyrmecis sp. nov., N. queirozi sp. nov., N. rapunzelae sp. nov., and N. truncata sp. nov. Neodohrniphora wasmanni Borgmeier is revalidated and two new synonymies are proposed: N. similis Prado is synonymized with N. acromyrmecis Borgmeier, and N. unichaeta Disney is synonymized with N. wasmanni Borgmeier. In order to provide stability and a necessary standard for comparison, a neotype for N. cognata Prado is designated based on material collected from the same type locality, data, and collector as the now lost or destroyed holotype. A new key for all the females of Neodohrniphora, new host records, and details of ovipositor morphology are provided.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Schizoptera Fieber is a monophyletic and the largest genus of minute litter bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Dipsocoromorpha). Its current concept is supported by a recent molecular phylogeny and comprises nearly 90 described extant and two fossil species divided into four subgenera: Schizoptera (Cantharocoris), Schizoptera (Odontorhagus), Schizoptera (Schizoptera) and Schizoptera (Zygophleps). We here taxonomically revise the subgenus Schizoptera (Zygophleps), which so far contains Schizoptera unica from Guatemala and Schizoptera corallia , Schizoptera simla , and Schizoptera ultima from Trinidad. The subgenus is diagnosed by the unique triangular shape of the posterior membranal cell. The following 36 species are here described: Schizoptera aculeata sp.n., Schizoptera applanata sp.n., Schizoptera bella sp.n., Schizoptera biancae sp.n., Schizoptera cassiae sp.n., Schizoptera confusa sp.n., Schizoptera costarriquenha sp.n., Schizoptera cuspida sp.n., Schizoptera ecuadoriana sp.n., Schizoptera elegantissima sp.n., Schizoptera emsleyi sp.n., Schizoptera erosa sp.n., Schizoptera erwini sp.n., Schizoptera falcata sp.n., Schizoptera familia sp.n., Schizoptera furcata sp.n., Schizoptera fuscodorsata sp.n., Schizoptera hirsuta sp.n., Schizoptera inaequalis sp.n., Schizoptera inca sp.n., Schizoptera kayi sp.n., Schizoptera knyshovi sp.n., Schizoptera magnifica sp.n., Schizoptera mallochi sp.n., Schizoptera mcateei sp.n., Schizoptera orellanensis sp.n., Schizoptera paraensis sp.n., Schizoptera peruviana sp.n., Schizoptera pichincha sp.n., Schizoptera pinduca sp.n., Schizoptera prima sp.n., Schizoptera priva sp.n., Schizoptera ramosa sp.n., Schizoptera solitaria sp.n., Schizoptera speira sp.n., and Schizoptera stricta sp.n. The majority of species herein described were collected in Brazil, Costa Rica, and Ecuador, expanding the known distribution of the subgenus. We provide diagnoses, descriptions, photographs of habitus and subgenital plates, line drawings of diagnostic male genitalic features, and a distribution map. A key to species based on males is also presented.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Authors: Ma Zhenxing and Zhou Changfa

Abstract

A new subgenus, Siniron subgen. n., is established for five Chinese species of Epeorus Eaton, 1881 to recognize their distinct difference from other subgenera: 1) in nymphs, tergalius I widely expanded anteriorly while tergalius VII curved but unfolded, well developed paired spines on abdominal terga; 2) in adults, unique coloration of wings, penis with distinct median titillators. Among them, nymphal stages of four previously known species, E. (S.) sinensis (), E. (S.) dayongensis , E. (S.) herklotsi (Hsu, 1936b) and E. (S.) ngi , are described for the first time and imaginal stages are also re-described. The fifth species, which has apically pigmented hind wings in imago and protuberances on pronotum in nymph, is described as a new species E. (S.) tuberculatus sp. n. All these species can also be delimited by COI sequences. In addition, their distribution in China is provided.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

The Carabidae is by far the largest family of the Adephaga, with more than 40,000 described species. Whereas their phylogeny has been extensively studied, convergences and reversals in morphological traits prevent a robust phylogenetic concept so far. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of Notiophilus quadripunctatus (Nebriinae) and Omophrom limbatum (Omophroninae) using high-throughput sequencing. Both mitogenomes consisted of a single circular DNA molecule that encoded the typical 13 protein-coding genes, two subunits of mitochondrial RNAs, 22 tRNAs and a putative control region. Our phylogenetic study placed Omophrom limbatum as sister taxon to all other analyzed ground beetle species whereas Notiophilus quadripunctatus was identified as sister to Nebria brevicollis as part of the Nebriinae. The analyses also support the monophyly of the Cicindelidae but place Trachypachus holmbergi (Trachypachidae) within the Carabidae. Nevertheless, almost all carabid subfamilies with more than one analyzed species were identified as monophyla.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Microplitis Foerster is a highly diverse and cosmopolitan genus within Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonoidea, Braconidae). Microplitis ceratomiae Riley, a widely distributed North American species, exclusively attacks sphingid caterpillars. In this paper, M. ceratomiae is reported parasitizing a caterpillar of Sphinx poecila Stephens (Sphingidae) which was collected feeding on Spiraea alba Du Roi (Rosaceae), a species of white meadowsweet native to the wet soils of the Allegheny Mountains and other portions of eastern North America. Here, we report and describe this new host-parasitoid-food plant association in southern New Hampshire, and include a distribution map for the species. Biological, ecological and phylogenetic analyses, and an identification key for the nine known species of Microplitis that attack sphingids in the New World are provided.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution