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Editors: Zong-qi Cai and Yuan Xingpei
Chinese Texts in the World publishes scholarly works on the reception, transmission, assimilation, and reinvention of Chinese texts in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas; as well as critical studies that explore new pathways connecting Chinese texts with today’s world.
Whether Chinese texts were transmitted along the ancient Silk Road, or through modern digital technologies, such well-traveled texts hold great promise for illuminating multiple aspects of China’s cultural relations with the world. The same holds true for the examination how reconfigured Chinese texts made their way back to China, to be reconstituted as culturally polyvalent, hybrid “imports”.
Critical studies explore new ways of engaging Chinese texts with non-Chinese intellectual and cultural traditions. Such studies include, but are not limited to, a traditional textually grounded Sinological work that contains a substantive dialogue with for instance Western texts; a collaborative work by Asia-based and non-Asia-based scholars on the critical issues important to different traditions; and even a work on non-Chinese texts as long as it significantly draws insights from or engages a substantive dialogue with the Chinese traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. Manuscripts that are published have been accepted after double-anonymous peer review.

《世界语境下的中国典籍》系列丛书包括两大类学术著作。一类是中国典籍接受史的研究,着重分析各种典籍在亚洲、欧洲、非洲和南北美洲的接受、传播、同化与再发明过程;另一类是典籍的文本研究,努力在今日的世界语境中重新诠释中国典籍,并寻求开拓与世界各种文化传统互动交流的新途径。
第一类著作注重传统意义上的典籍接受史研究,所涵盖的文献,既有沿古代丝绸之路流布的古代典籍,也有通过现代数字技术传播的论著。此类著作主要探究中国典籍在中国以外地区(包括亚洲、欧洲、非洲和美洲等地)传播、再解释、再创造、进一步传播过程中,体现了哪些不同路径。除此之外,也将分析这些经过重新加工的典籍文本怎样回到中国,然后又怎样作为多元文化的混合“舶来品”被吸纳接收,再次发展。这套丛书还将综述分析中国典籍翻译如何塑造海外各地对中国文化的看法。这套丛书意在开拓广大非专业读者、学生、学者们的视野,帮助他们在自身的文学和文化传统中发掘出未被留意的中国因素,也可能对中国文化影响形成全新理解。对于从事国学研究的学生和学者而言,这套丛书能帮助他们掌握西方学界在西方批评范式的影响下重新解释中国文献的最新趋势。
第二类著作注重广义上的文本分析研究,目标在于建立中文文本和异域知识文化传统之间新的互动关系。这种广义文本研究充分体现跨文化视野,其中包括三种学术成果:其一、能够与西方传统进行内容比较的汉学著作;其二、亚洲学者与西方的学者针对重要议题而展开的合着或;其三、能与中国学术和文化传统展开有实质意义的西方学术著作。
数千年来,丰富多彩的中文典籍文本历经万里,远赴各方,编织出一条条连接中国和世界文化的纽带。中国典籍文本在世界各地的传播过程,对于加深彼此相互了解,共同推动人类文明的进步具有极为深远的意义。我们希望,读者们能够通过阅读这套丛书,追溯中文文献的流传、以及观察当今中华文化的传播和再造的过程,深切体验激动人心的的文化探胜之旅。
Author: Peimin Ni

Abstract

Unlike typical journal articles that deal with specific issues in detail, this article offers a sketchy comprehensive re-description of the Confucian Way of family that serves the purpose of providing a bird’s-eye view to grasp the fact that, for Confucianism, family is not merely a part of the puzzle of human life, nor merely an ontological entity that serves as the foundation of the Confucian theory, but more a “Way” of living or gongfu 功夫 (aka kung fu) that comprised of values toward which cultivation of the person is practiced, an art of life to be mastered, and a model of social order to be implemented.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Rafal Banka

Abstract

In this article, I discuss parthood status in mereologically interpreted Daoist metaphysics, based on the Daodejing. I depart from the dao and you interrelation, which mereologically overlap by sharing parts. I consider the case of a complete overlap, which (a) challenges proper parthood, according to which a part cannot be identical with the whole that it composes, and (b) entails the question of identity that, while complying with classical mereology, cannot be consistent with Daoist metaphysics. The discussion leads to abandoning proper parthood and antisymmetry axiom from classical axiomatics. It also shows a plausible further direction for mereological reconstruction.

Open Access
In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy

Abstract

Confucian scholars often reference the Yijing 《易經》 (the Classic of Changes), the Liji 《禮記》 (Records of Rituals), and other classics in their advocacy for female chastity. Perplexingly, vocabulary that suggests extremism, which often results in self-imposed – or public sanctioned – suicide, starvation, or physical disfigurement of women during the pre-modern China and the early republic, either does not appear or rarely appears in the Yijing or other early Confucian canons. In these early texts, both zhen and jie have multiple meanings. Neither term is confined to a specific gender. This fact suggests that the original meanings of zhen and jie in the Yijing, composed around 1046 BCE–771 BCE, had likely been altered and radicalized in later times. I use word frequency analysis, examination of hexagrams, and the method of intertextuality to expose and deconstruct interpretive contradictions and attempt to restore these concepts to their original meaning without distortion.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Free access
In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Lisa Raphals

Abstract

Weaving and archery are strongly gendered skills, and both occur repeatedly in both Chinese and Greek accounts of skill and ethics. I examine both metaphors and narratives that liken these skills to various aspects of ethics, wisdom and government, with particular interest in how or whether the account of the skill reflects the experience of the gender of its typical expert.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Jana S. Rošker

Abstract

Culturally conditioned differences between women must be seen and theorized about in order to avoid essentialist generalizations about “women’s issues.” In this context, the idea of a universal patriarchal order is questioned, as is the idea of a general, universally equivalent type of feminism. Through analysis of the political philosophy of He Zhen (1884–circa 1920), this paper aims to present a Chinese alternative to liberal feminism based on the assumption that the Western feminist movement might not be a suitable means of abolishing women’s oppression in China, because it is culturally conditioned and rooted in the particulars of Western social history.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy

Abstract

I approach Murasaki Shikibu’s marvelous literary pearl The Tale of Genji (Genji Monogatari) as analogous to glistening orbs that “come out of the disease of suffering oysters,” the suffering being the death of her beloved husband Fujiwara no Nobutaka (950?–1001). In addition to drawing evidence from the novel itself, I have relied on Murasaki’s lesser-known Poetic Memoirs and Diary that offer important insights into her state of mind and circumspect literary style. The Lotus Sūtra is the key that unlocks Murasaki’s philosophical intent, with its use of parables and poems to provoke deeper understandings of Buddhism and personal realizations. The Buddhist principle of impermanence (Sanskrit anitya; Japanese mujōkan) serves as both the aesthetic of aware and an unavoidable fact that residents of the Heian court (like those in the Lotus Sūtra’s Burning House) choose to ignore or escape by reveling in superficial pursuits of beauty and political power. Various characters in the novel attempt to follow the path to the epistemological awakening the author Murasaki sought for herself.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy